Craft as a Form of Mindful Inquiry

Louise Valentine

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

In this research project ‘Communication of Craft Practice’ is the subject and the problem is one of transparency of the intellectual act and accessibility to the embodied knowledge. Why? The skill of coherently expressing the intellectual and personal voice within the development of craft practice is usually missing. There is a gap in our knowledge. The methodological framework is Mindful Inquiry which is a synthesis of critical social science, hermeneutics, phenomenology and Buddhism (Bentz and Shapiro, 1998).The research involves working directly with professional practitioners to embark on a series of creative journeys from which craft as an experience, process, product and service could be observed and evaluated. The practitioners included a 3-D metal designer, curator, interactive jeweller, product artist and woven textile designer. The aim is to reassess the term craft practice as a means of understanding the impact of social, political and technological change by documenting the practitioner’s thinking processes throughout a period of practice. It is to consider combining visual and written
outputs as means of supporting the identification of the new knowledge gained through practice, and how this knowledge is used cumulatively to develop craft. The objective is to nurture a dialogue with practice and to document the process of thinking and making associated with craft. This paper provides the context and framework for research as well as presenting the findings from it. It exposes the methods and the accompanying rational for using them in relation to mindful inquiry, and it presents a new perspective from which to view and discuss craft practice. The argument is concerned with articulating the relevance of mindful inquiry as a methodology for critiquing and supporting the development of craft thereby supporting the contextual understanding and meaning of the research findings and procedures when they are presented. It is also to offer new craft knowledge in terms of the phrase ‘practice’
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationDesign and Complexity
Subtitle of host publicationThe proceedings of the 2010 DRS Montreal Conference
EditorsDavid Durling
Place of PublicationMontreal, Canada
Pages1
Number of pages18
ISBN (Electronic)9782981198525
Publication statusPublished - 7 Jul 2010
EventDesign Research Society 2010 - University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada
Duration: 7 Jul 20109 Jul 2010
http://www.drs2010.umontreal.ca/proceedings.php

Conference

ConferenceDesign Research Society 2010
CountryCanada
CityMontreal
Period7/07/109/07/10
Internet address

Fingerprint

Buddhism
phenomenology
hermeneutics
technological change
political change
transparency
artist
social change
research project
social science
dialogue
communication
methodology
knowledge
experience

Cite this

Valentine, L. (2010). Craft as a Form of Mindful Inquiry. In D. Durling (Ed.), Design and Complexity: The proceedings of the 2010 DRS Montreal Conference (pp. 1). [119] Montreal, Canada.
Valentine, Louise. / Craft as a Form of Mindful Inquiry. Design and Complexity: The proceedings of the 2010 DRS Montreal Conference. editor / David Durling. Montreal, Canada, 2010. pp. 1
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Valentine, L 2010, Craft as a Form of Mindful Inquiry. in D Durling (ed.), Design and Complexity: The proceedings of the 2010 DRS Montreal Conference., 119, Montreal, Canada, pp. 1, Design Research Society 2010, Montreal, Canada, 7/07/10.

Craft as a Form of Mindful Inquiry. / Valentine, Louise.

Design and Complexity: The proceedings of the 2010 DRS Montreal Conference. ed. / David Durling. Montreal, Canada, 2010. p. 1 119.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Valentine L. Craft as a Form of Mindful Inquiry. In Durling D, editor, Design and Complexity: The proceedings of the 2010 DRS Montreal Conference. Montreal, Canada. 2010. p. 1. 119