Cultural differences in self-recognition

the early development of autonomous and related selves?

Josephine Ross (Lead / Corresponding author), Mandy Yilmaz, Rachel Dale, Rose Cassidy, Iraz Yildirim , M. Suzanne Zeedyk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)
205 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Fifteen to 18 month-old infants from three nationalities were observed interacting with their mothers and during two self-recognition tasks. Scottish interactions were characterized by distal contact, Zambian interactions by proximal contact, and Turkish interactions by a mixture of contact strategies. These culturally distinct experiences may scaffold different perspectives on self. In support, Scottish infants performed best in a task requiring recognition of the self in an individualistic context (mirror self-recognition), whereas Zambian infants performed best in a task requiring recognition of the self in a less individualistic context (body-as-obstacle task). Turkish infants performed similarly to Zambian infants on the body-as-obstacle task, but outperformed Zambians on the mirror self-recognition task. Verbal contact (a distal strategy) was positively related to mirror self-recognition and negatively related to passing the body-as-obstacle task. Directive action and speech (proximal strategies) were negatively related to mirror self-recognition. Self-awareness performance was best predicted by cultural context; autonomous settings predicted success in mirror self-recognition, and related settings predicted success in the body-as-obstacle task. This novel data substantiates the idea that cultural factors may play a role in the early expression of self-awareness. More broadly, the results highlight the importance of moving beyond the mark test, and designing culturally sensitive tests of self-awareness.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere12387
Number of pages13
JournalDevelopmental Science
Volume20
Issue number3
Early online date29 Jan 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Apr 2017

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Ross, Josephine ; Yilmaz, Mandy ; Dale, Rachel ; Cassidy, Rose ; Yildirim , Iraz ; Zeedyk, M. Suzanne. / Cultural differences in self-recognition : the early development of autonomous and related selves?. In: Developmental Science. 2017 ; Vol. 20, No. 3.
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abstract = "Fifteen to 18 month-old infants from three nationalities were observed interacting with their mothers and during two self-recognition tasks. Scottish interactions were characterized by distal contact, Zambian interactions by proximal contact, and Turkish interactions by a mixture of contact strategies. These culturally distinct experiences may scaffold different perspectives on self. In support, Scottish infants performed best in a task requiring recognition of the self in an individualistic context (mirror self-recognition), whereas Zambian infants performed best in a task requiring recognition of the self in a less individualistic context (body-as-obstacle task). Turkish infants performed similarly to Zambian infants on the body-as-obstacle task, but outperformed Zambians on the mirror self-recognition task. Verbal contact (a distal strategy) was positively related to mirror self-recognition and negatively related to passing the body-as-obstacle task. Directive action and speech (proximal strategies) were negatively related to mirror self-recognition. Self-awareness performance was best predicted by cultural context; autonomous settings predicted success in mirror self-recognition, and related settings predicted success in the body-as-obstacle task. This novel data substantiates the idea that cultural factors may play a role in the early expression of self-awareness. More broadly, the results highlight the importance of moving beyond the mark test, and designing culturally sensitive tests of self-awareness.",
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Cultural differences in self-recognition : the early development of autonomous and related selves? / Ross, Josephine (Lead / Corresponding author); Yilmaz, Mandy; Dale, Rachel; Cassidy, Rose; Yildirim , Iraz; Zeedyk, M. Suzanne.

In: Developmental Science, Vol. 20, No. 3, e12387, 20.04.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Yilmaz, Mandy

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