Cysteine Glutathionylation Acts as a Redox Switch in Endothelial Cells

Agathe Lermant, Colin E. Murdoch (Lead / Corresponding author)

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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Abstract

Oxidative post-translational modifications (oxPTM) of receptors, enzymes, ion channels and transcription factors play an important role in cell signaling. oxPTMs are a key way in which oxidative stress can influence cell behavior during diverse pathological settings such as cardiovascular diseases (CVD), cancer, neurodegeneration and inflammatory response. In addition, changes in oxPTM are likely to be ways in which low level reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) may contribute to redox signaling, exerting changes in physiological responses including angiogenesis, cardiac remodeling and embryogenesis. Among oxPTM, S-glutathionylation of reactive cysteines emerges as an important regulator of vascular homeostasis by modulating endothelial cell (EC) responses to their local redox environment. This review summarizes the latest findings of S-glutathionylated proteins in major EC pathways, and the functional consequences on vascular pathophysiology. This review highlights the diversity of molecules affected by S-glutathionylation, and the complex consequences on EC function, thereby demonstrating an intricate dual role of RONS-induced S-glutathionylation in maintaining vascular homeostasis and participating in various pathological processes.

Original languageEnglish
Article number315
Pages (from-to)1-25
Number of pages25
JournalAntioxidants
Volume8
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Aug 2019

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Post Translational Protein Processing
Oxidation-Reduction
Cysteine
Blood Vessels
Reactive Nitrogen Species
Endothelial Cells
Reactive Oxygen Species
Homeostasis
Protein S
Pathologic Processes
Ion Channels
Embryonic Development
Oxidative Stress
Transcription Factors
Cardiovascular Diseases
Enzymes
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular diseases
  • Endothelial cells
  • Glutathione
  • Oxidative post-translational modifications
  • Oxidative stress
  • Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species
  • Redox
  • S-glutathionylation
  • Signal transduction

Cite this

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title = "Cysteine Glutathionylation Acts as a Redox Switch in Endothelial Cells",
abstract = "Oxidative post-translational modifications (oxPTM) of receptors, enzymes, ion channels and transcription factors play an important role in cell signaling. oxPTMs are a key way in which oxidative stress can influence cell behavior during diverse pathological settings such as cardiovascular diseases (CVD), cancer, neurodegeneration and inflammatory response. In addition, changes in oxPTM are likely to be ways in which low level reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) may contribute to redox signaling, exerting changes in physiological responses including angiogenesis, cardiac remodeling and embryogenesis. Among oxPTM, S-glutathionylation of reactive cysteines emerges as an important regulator of vascular homeostasis by modulating endothelial cell (EC) responses to their local redox environment. This review summarizes the latest findings of S-glutathionylated proteins in major EC pathways, and the functional consequences on vascular pathophysiology. This review highlights the diversity of molecules affected by S-glutathionylation, and the complex consequences on EC function, thereby demonstrating an intricate dual role of RONS-induced S-glutathionylation in maintaining vascular homeostasis and participating in various pathological processes.",
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Cysteine Glutathionylation Acts as a Redox Switch in Endothelial Cells. / Lermant, Agathe; Murdoch, Colin E. (Lead / Corresponding author).

In: Antioxidants , Vol. 8, No. 8, 315, 16.08.2019, p. 1-25.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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T1 - Cysteine Glutathionylation Acts as a Redox Switch in Endothelial Cells

AU - Lermant, Agathe

AU - Murdoch, Colin E.

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PY - 2019/8/16

Y1 - 2019/8/16

N2 - Oxidative post-translational modifications (oxPTM) of receptors, enzymes, ion channels and transcription factors play an important role in cell signaling. oxPTMs are a key way in which oxidative stress can influence cell behavior during diverse pathological settings such as cardiovascular diseases (CVD), cancer, neurodegeneration and inflammatory response. In addition, changes in oxPTM are likely to be ways in which low level reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) may contribute to redox signaling, exerting changes in physiological responses including angiogenesis, cardiac remodeling and embryogenesis. Among oxPTM, S-glutathionylation of reactive cysteines emerges as an important regulator of vascular homeostasis by modulating endothelial cell (EC) responses to their local redox environment. This review summarizes the latest findings of S-glutathionylated proteins in major EC pathways, and the functional consequences on vascular pathophysiology. This review highlights the diversity of molecules affected by S-glutathionylation, and the complex consequences on EC function, thereby demonstrating an intricate dual role of RONS-induced S-glutathionylation in maintaining vascular homeostasis and participating in various pathological processes.

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