Depersonalization

Craig McGarty, Ana-Maria Bliuc, Renata Bongiorno

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingEntry for encyclopedia/dictionary

Abstract

Depersonalization is a concept developed by self-categorization theorist John Turner and his colleagues in the 1980s to refer to the process of thinking of the self at a particular time as a group member rather than as a unique individual. Depersonalization can be seen as a process of stereotyping, but unlike other forms of stereotyping related to perceiving other people as group members, it involves self-stereotyping. To put it another way, depersonalization is the transformation from thinking of oneself as “I” or “me” to “we” or “us.”.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEncyclopedia of Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
EditorsJohn M. Levine, Michael A. Hogg
PublisherSAGE PublicationsSage CA: Los Angeles, CA
Pages197-199
Number of pages3
ISBN (Electronic)9781412972017
ISBN (Print) 9781412942089
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

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    McGarty, C., Bliuc, A-M., & Bongiorno, R. (2010). Depersonalization. In J. M. Levine, & M. A. Hogg (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Group Processes & Intergroup Relations (pp. 197-199). SAGE PublicationsSage CA: Los Angeles, CA. https://doi.org/10.4135/9781412972017.n61