Description of arts therapies practice with adults suffering from depression in the UK

Quantitative results from the nationwide survey

Ania Zubala (Lead / Corresponding author), Donald J. MacIntyre, Nigel Gleeson, Vicky Karkou

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    13 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    There is growing evidence that arts therapies may be under-used treatments for the 'global burden' of depression. However, the experiences of arts therapists, their methods, tools and ways of working with this client group remain unclear. Arts therapies in the UK are a form of psychotherapy. They use arts media alongside therapeutic relationship as means of therapeutic change and include four disciplines: Art Therapy (AT), Music Therapy (MT), Dance Movement Psychotherapy (DMP) and Drama Therapy (DT). In 2011, all arts therapists registered in the UK were invited to complete an online questionnaire concerning their practice in general and specifically in relation to clients with depression. The Arts Therapies Survey received 395 responses. Arts therapists who work primarily with depression were identified and compared to those who do not work with depression on a range of factors, including preferred theoretical approaches and style of working. Arts therapists who specialise in depression tend to follow Psychodynamic principles more often, are more likely to be older and experienced, work with groups, in health settings and with adults more often than children or adolescents. These quantitative findings enable the description of most common practice of arts therapies with depression in the UK and are intended to serve as a reference for arts therapists themselves and other professionals interested in the treatment of depression. Qualitative data gathered in the survey will be presented in a separate paper, with the aim of deepening the understanding already gained.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)458-464
    Number of pages7
    JournalThe Arts in Psychotherapy
    Volume40
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2013

    Fingerprint

    Art Therapy
    Art
    Depression
    Psychotherapy
    Psychodrama
    Music Therapy
    Therapeutics
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    General Practice
    Health

    Keywords

    • Adults
    • Arts therapies
    • Clinical practice
    • Depression
    • Survey
    • UK

    Cite this

    Zubala, Ania ; MacIntyre, Donald J. ; Gleeson, Nigel ; Karkou, Vicky. / Description of arts therapies practice with adults suffering from depression in the UK : Quantitative results from the nationwide survey. In: The Arts in Psychotherapy. 2013 ; Vol. 40, No. 5. pp. 458-464.
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    Description of arts therapies practice with adults suffering from depression in the UK : Quantitative results from the nationwide survey. / Zubala, Ania (Lead / Corresponding author); MacIntyre, Donald J.; Gleeson, Nigel; Karkou, Vicky.

    In: The Arts in Psychotherapy, Vol. 40, No. 5, 01.11.2013, p. 458-464.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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