Design, implementation and evaluation of a medical education programme using the ambulatory diagnostic and treatment centre

John Dent, Susan Skene, Dilip Nathwani, Martin Pippard, Gominda Ponnamperuma, Margery Davis

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In the UK a central government initiative is seeking to transfer aspects of specialist NHS care to community settings using ambulatory diagnostic and treatment centres (ADTCs). Aims: Following the redevelopment of a district general hospital as an ADTC, we were interested in the feasibility of using this new facility to deliver a structured programme for undergraduate medical students. Method: Twenty self-selected fifth year medical students at the University of Dundee, together with teaching and administration staff in the ADTC, took part in the study during the academic year 2005–2006. Results: One hundred percent of students and 73% of staff responded to a questionnaire pitched at the level of reaction to the course. The key findings were that the students found the teaching venues useful, the general environment conducive to learning, and the content appropriate to their needs. Staff felt that patients were not unhappy or disturbed by having students present and did not think the presence of students inhibited their clinical work. They appreciated the new opportunity to teach. Conclusions: An ADTC is a viable setting for structured teaching of undergraduate medical students. It provides a context for medical student leaning away from the main teaching hospital.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)341-345
    Number of pages5
    JournalMedical Teacher
    Volume29
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - May 2007

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