Developing evidence-based recommendations in public health

Incorporating the views of practitioners, service users and user representatives

Mary J. Renfrew (Lead / Corresponding author), Lisa Dyson, Gill Herbert, Alison McFadden, Felicia McCormick, James Thomas, Helen Spiby

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    19 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: Guidance based on a systematic assessment of the evidence base has become a fundamental tool in the cycle of evidence-based practice and policy internationally. The process of moving from the formal evidence base derived from research studies to the formation and agreement of recommendations is however acknowledged to be problematic, especially in public health; and the involvement of practitioners, service commissioners and service users in that process is both important and methodologically challenging. Aim: To test a structured process of developing evidence-based recommendations in public health while involving a broad constituency of practitioners, service commissioners and service user representatives. Methods: As part of the development of national public health recommendations to promote and support breastfeeding in England, the methodological challenges of involving stakeholders were examined and addressed. There were three main stages: (i) an assessment of the formal evidence base (210 studies graded); (ii) electronic and fieldwork-based consultation with practitioners, service commissioners and service user representatives (563 participants), and an in-depth analytical consultation in three 'diagonal slice' workshops (89 participants); (iii) synthesis of the previous two stages. Results and conclusions: The process resulted in widely agreed recommendations together with suggestions for implementation. It was very positively evaluated by participants and those likely to use the recommendations. Service users had a strong voice throughout and participated actively. This mix of methods allowed a transparent, accountable process for formulating recommendations based on scientific, theoretical, practical and expert evidence, with the added potential to enhance implementation.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)3-15
    Number of pages13
    JournalHealth Expectations
    Volume11
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Mar 2008

    Fingerprint

    Public Health
    Referral and Consultation
    Evidence-Based Practice
    Breast Feeding
    England
    Education
    Research

    Cite this

    @article{5a0f0e5e79dc427ab44cb7d1b07fc1d7,
    title = "Developing evidence-based recommendations in public health: Incorporating the views of practitioners, service users and user representatives",
    abstract = "Background: Guidance based on a systematic assessment of the evidence base has become a fundamental tool in the cycle of evidence-based practice and policy internationally. The process of moving from the formal evidence base derived from research studies to the formation and agreement of recommendations is however acknowledged to be problematic, especially in public health; and the involvement of practitioners, service commissioners and service users in that process is both important and methodologically challenging. Aim: To test a structured process of developing evidence-based recommendations in public health while involving a broad constituency of practitioners, service commissioners and service user representatives. Methods: As part of the development of national public health recommendations to promote and support breastfeeding in England, the methodological challenges of involving stakeholders were examined and addressed. There were three main stages: (i) an assessment of the formal evidence base (210 studies graded); (ii) electronic and fieldwork-based consultation with practitioners, service commissioners and service user representatives (563 participants), and an in-depth analytical consultation in three 'diagonal slice' workshops (89 participants); (iii) synthesis of the previous two stages. Results and conclusions: The process resulted in widely agreed recommendations together with suggestions for implementation. It was very positively evaluated by participants and those likely to use the recommendations. Service users had a strong voice throughout and participated actively. This mix of methods allowed a transparent, accountable process for formulating recommendations based on scientific, theoretical, practical and expert evidence, with the added potential to enhance implementation.",
    author = "Renfrew, {Mary J.} and Lisa Dyson and Gill Herbert and Alison McFadden and Felicia McCormick and James Thomas and Helen Spiby",
    note = "MEDLINE{\circledR} is the source for the MeSH terms of this document.",
    year = "2008",
    month = "3",
    doi = "10.1111/j.1369-7625.2007.00471.x",
    language = "English",
    volume = "11",
    pages = "3--15",
    journal = "Health Expectations",
    issn = "1369-6513",
    publisher = "Wiley",
    number = "1",

    }

    Developing evidence-based recommendations in public health : Incorporating the views of practitioners, service users and user representatives. / Renfrew, Mary J. (Lead / Corresponding author); Dyson, Lisa; Herbert, Gill; McFadden, Alison; McCormick, Felicia; Thomas, James; Spiby, Helen.

    In: Health Expectations, Vol. 11, No. 1, 03.2008, p. 3-15.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Developing evidence-based recommendations in public health

    T2 - Incorporating the views of practitioners, service users and user representatives

    AU - Renfrew, Mary J.

    AU - Dyson, Lisa

    AU - Herbert, Gill

    AU - McFadden, Alison

    AU - McCormick, Felicia

    AU - Thomas, James

    AU - Spiby, Helen

    N1 - MEDLINE® is the source for the MeSH terms of this document.

    PY - 2008/3

    Y1 - 2008/3

    N2 - Background: Guidance based on a systematic assessment of the evidence base has become a fundamental tool in the cycle of evidence-based practice and policy internationally. The process of moving from the formal evidence base derived from research studies to the formation and agreement of recommendations is however acknowledged to be problematic, especially in public health; and the involvement of practitioners, service commissioners and service users in that process is both important and methodologically challenging. Aim: To test a structured process of developing evidence-based recommendations in public health while involving a broad constituency of practitioners, service commissioners and service user representatives. Methods: As part of the development of national public health recommendations to promote and support breastfeeding in England, the methodological challenges of involving stakeholders were examined and addressed. There were three main stages: (i) an assessment of the formal evidence base (210 studies graded); (ii) electronic and fieldwork-based consultation with practitioners, service commissioners and service user representatives (563 participants), and an in-depth analytical consultation in three 'diagonal slice' workshops (89 participants); (iii) synthesis of the previous two stages. Results and conclusions: The process resulted in widely agreed recommendations together with suggestions for implementation. It was very positively evaluated by participants and those likely to use the recommendations. Service users had a strong voice throughout and participated actively. This mix of methods allowed a transparent, accountable process for formulating recommendations based on scientific, theoretical, practical and expert evidence, with the added potential to enhance implementation.

    AB - Background: Guidance based on a systematic assessment of the evidence base has become a fundamental tool in the cycle of evidence-based practice and policy internationally. The process of moving from the formal evidence base derived from research studies to the formation and agreement of recommendations is however acknowledged to be problematic, especially in public health; and the involvement of practitioners, service commissioners and service users in that process is both important and methodologically challenging. Aim: To test a structured process of developing evidence-based recommendations in public health while involving a broad constituency of practitioners, service commissioners and service user representatives. Methods: As part of the development of national public health recommendations to promote and support breastfeeding in England, the methodological challenges of involving stakeholders were examined and addressed. There were three main stages: (i) an assessment of the formal evidence base (210 studies graded); (ii) electronic and fieldwork-based consultation with practitioners, service commissioners and service user representatives (563 participants), and an in-depth analytical consultation in three 'diagonal slice' workshops (89 participants); (iii) synthesis of the previous two stages. Results and conclusions: The process resulted in widely agreed recommendations together with suggestions for implementation. It was very positively evaluated by participants and those likely to use the recommendations. Service users had a strong voice throughout and participated actively. This mix of methods allowed a transparent, accountable process for formulating recommendations based on scientific, theoretical, practical and expert evidence, with the added potential to enhance implementation.

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=39049149956&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1111/j.1369-7625.2007.00471.x

    DO - 10.1111/j.1369-7625.2007.00471.x

    M3 - Article

    VL - 11

    SP - 3

    EP - 15

    JO - Health Expectations

    JF - Health Expectations

    SN - 1369-6513

    IS - 1

    ER -