Developmental trends in cord and postpartum serum thyroid hormones in preterm infants

Fiona L. R. Williams, Judith Simpson, Caroline Delahunty, Simon A. Ogston, Jacoba J. Bongers-Schokking, Nuala Murphy, Hans van Toor, Sing-Yung Wu, Theo J. Visser, Robert Hume, Scottish Preterm Thyroid Group

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    Abstract

    The purpose of this study was first to clarify postnatal trends in sera T-4, free T-4 (FT4), T-4-binding globulin, TSH, T-3, rT(3), and T-4 sulfate levels in cord and at 7, 14, and 28 d in groups of preterm infants at 23-27 wk (n = 101), 28-30 wk (n = 196), and 31-34 (n = 253) wk gestation, and second to compare these trends to those of term infants and also with cord sera levels of equivalent gestational ages (n = 812; 23-42 wk gestation). In all preterm groups, TSH and rT(3) decrease to below, T-4-binding globulin increases to within, and T-3 and T-4 sulfate increase to above cord levels of equivalent gestational age. Term infants are hyperthyroxinemic relative to cord and nonpregnant adult levels of T-4. Postnatal T-4 increases are attenuated in 31- to 34-wk infants, absent in 28- to 30-wk infants (although levels are equivalent to gestational age), and crucially reversed in 23- to 27-wk infants. This immature group is hypothyroxinemic relative to other groups and to cord levels of equivalent gestational age. Compared with term infants, postnatal FT4 increases are lower in 31- to 34-wk infants, attenuated in 28- to 30-wk infants, and absent in 23- to 27-wk infants. The 23- to 27-wk group is distinctive; they are hypothyroxinemic on T-4 levels, yet FT4 levels are within the cord levels of equivalent gestational age.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)5314-5320
    Number of pages7
    JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism
    Volume89
    Issue number11
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2004

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  • Cite this

    Williams, F. L. R., Simpson, J., Delahunty, C., Ogston, S. A., Bongers-Schokking, J. J., Murphy, N., van Toor, H., Wu, S-Y., Visser, T. J., Hume, R., & Scottish Preterm Thyroid Group (2004). Developmental trends in cord and postpartum serum thyroid hormones in preterm infants. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 89(11), 5314-5320. https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2004-0869