Diabetes in the young: what are their long term health prospects?

Stephen Greene (Lead / Corresponding author)

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The vast majority of children and adolescents diagnosed with type 1 diabetes live a fulfilling and appropriate life in modern developed society. Readily available insulin therapy, blood glucose monitoring and comprehensive education and support programmes delivered by health professionals trained in paediatric diabetes allow children to grow and develop normally and attend standard education with participation in virtually all activities of their choice. While the burden of diabetes management sometimes weighs heavily on young people and their families, the majority cope with the daily routine of diabetes for most of the time. The main acute complications of diabetes, hypoglycaemia and diabetic ketoacidosis, are a persisting concern but in well organised health services efficient health support systems deliver rapid management plans for patients and their families that aim to prevent hospitalisation. Previous diabetes complications such as increased infections (eg, injection abscesses), poor growth and lipo-hypertrophy have in the main been eliminated. Over 80 years after the discovery of insulin, therefore, should there be reason for optimism about the long term outcome of diabetes in the young?
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)251-253
    Number of pages3
    JournalArchives of Disease in Childhood - Education and Practice Edition
    Volume94
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2009

    Keywords

    • STAGE RENAL-DISEASE
    • RISK-FACTORS
    • DECLINING INCIDENCE
    • GLYCEMIC CONTROL
    • FOLLOW-UP
    • CHILDREN
    • ADOLESCENTS
    • NEPHROPATHY
    • NATIONWIDE
    • ADULTS

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