Diet as a risk factor for peripheral arterial disease in the general population

The Edinburgh Artery Study

P. T. Donnan (Lead / Corresponding author), M. Thomson, F. G.R. Fowkes, R. J. Prescott, E. Housley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Edinburgh Artery Study included a cross-sectional survey of 1592 men and women (aged 55-74 y). One aim was to examine relationships between an indicator of peripheral arterial disease, the ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI), and dietary factors. Nutrient intake was derived from a food- frequency questionnaire. Higher frequency of consumption of fiber-containing foods was associated with greater mean ABPI in males and higher consumption of meat and meat products were significantly associated with low mean ABPI in males and females. In a multiple linear regression with ABPI as outcome and energy-adjusted nutrients as predictors, cereal fiber (P = 0.02) and alcohol (P = 0.04) were positively associated with the ABPI in males but not in females. Dietary vitamin E(α-tocopherol) intake was positively associated with ABPI (P = 0.04) independently of smoking and other nutrients. Dietary vitamin C intake was significantly related to ABPI (P = 0.006) only among those who had ever smoked.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)917-921
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume57
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1993

Fingerprint

Ankle Brachial Index
Peripheral Arterial Disease
Arteries
Diet
Pressure
Population
Food
Meat Products
Tocopherols
Vitamin E
Meat
Ascorbic Acid
Linear Models
Cross-Sectional Studies
Smoking
Alcohols

Keywords

  • Atherosclerosis
  • diet
  • dietary fiber
  • peripheral arterial disease
  • vitamin C
  • vitamin E

Cite this

Donnan, P. T. ; Thomson, M. ; Fowkes, F. G.R. ; Prescott, R. J. ; Housley, E. / Diet as a risk factor for peripheral arterial disease in the general population : The Edinburgh Artery Study. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1993 ; Vol. 57, No. 6. pp. 917-921.
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Diet as a risk factor for peripheral arterial disease in the general population : The Edinburgh Artery Study. / Donnan, P. T. (Lead / Corresponding author); Thomson, M.; Fowkes, F. G.R.; Prescott, R. J.; Housley, E.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 57, No. 6, 01.01.1993, p. 917-921.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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