Diet as a risk factor for peripheral arterial disease in the general population: The Edinburgh Artery Study

P. T. Donnan (Lead / Corresponding author), M. Thomson, F. G.R. Fowkes, R. J. Prescott, E. Housley

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63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Edinburgh Artery Study included a cross-sectional survey of 1592 men and women (aged 55-74 y). One aim was to examine relationships between an indicator of peripheral arterial disease, the ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI), and dietary factors. Nutrient intake was derived from a food- frequency questionnaire. Higher frequency of consumption of fiber-containing foods was associated with greater mean ABPI in males and higher consumption of meat and meat products were significantly associated with low mean ABPI in males and females. In a multiple linear regression with ABPI as outcome and energy-adjusted nutrients as predictors, cereal fiber (P = 0.02) and alcohol (P = 0.04) were positively associated with the ABPI in males but not in females. Dietary vitamin E(α-tocopherol) intake was positively associated with ABPI (P = 0.04) independently of smoking and other nutrients. Dietary vitamin C intake was significantly related to ABPI (P = 0.006) only among those who had ever smoked.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)917-921
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume57
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1993

Keywords

  • Atherosclerosis
  • diet
  • dietary fiber
  • peripheral arterial disease
  • vitamin C
  • vitamin E

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