Differences in endothelial function and vascular reactivity between Scottish and Arabic populations

Khalid E. Elherik, Faisel Khan, Jill J. F. Belch

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: The endothelium is a major organ that plays a central role in the regulation of blood flow, resists thrombus formation and maintains blood fluidity. Environmental, dietary, but also genetic factors might affect endothelial cell function and vascular activity. Methods and Results: Endothelium-dependent and -independent vascular responses were evaluated in 42 male subjects from two different populations: 30 Scottish and 12 Arabic (transient visitors to UK) (20-41 years old). Endothelium-dependent and -independent vascular responses were measured in the forearm skin using laser Doppler imaging after iontophoresis of increasing doses of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside, respectively. Endothelium-dependent responses were significantly greater in Arabic subjects compared with responses in Scottish subjects (mean ACh ratio 4.9 ± 1.2 v 3.8 ± 1.5, respectively, P = 0.013, ANOVA). Although there was no significant difference between the groups in endothelium-independent vascular responses (mean SNP ratio 3.4 ± 1.2 v 2.8 ± 1.2, respectively, P = 0.26, ANOVA), there was a trend however towards a higher peak SNP response in the Arabic group (5.3 ± 1.5 v 4.1 ± 1.9, respectively, P = 0.019). Conclusions: These results suggest that a significant difference exists in the endothelial function and vascular reactivity between these populations. Although the reasons for these differences are not clear, they may be related to differences in life styles, tradition, food intake, environmental and genetic factors.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)85-87
    Number of pages3
    JournalScottish Medical Journal
    Volume48
    Issue number3
    Publication statusPublished - 2003

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    Endothelium
    Blood Vessels
    Population
    Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
    Analysis of Variance
    Iontophoresis
    Vascular Endothelium
    Nitroprusside
    Forearm
    Acetylcholine
    Life Style
    Lasers
    Thrombosis
    Endothelial Cells
    Eating
    Skin

    Cite this

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    title = "Differences in endothelial function and vascular reactivity between Scottish and Arabic populations",
    abstract = "Background: The endothelium is a major organ that plays a central role in the regulation of blood flow, resists thrombus formation and maintains blood fluidity. Environmental, dietary, but also genetic factors might affect endothelial cell function and vascular activity. Methods and Results: Endothelium-dependent and -independent vascular responses were evaluated in 42 male subjects from two different populations: 30 Scottish and 12 Arabic (transient visitors to UK) (20-41 years old). Endothelium-dependent and -independent vascular responses were measured in the forearm skin using laser Doppler imaging after iontophoresis of increasing doses of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside, respectively. Endothelium-dependent responses were significantly greater in Arabic subjects compared with responses in Scottish subjects (mean ACh ratio 4.9 ± 1.2 v 3.8 ± 1.5, respectively, P = 0.013, ANOVA). Although there was no significant difference between the groups in endothelium-independent vascular responses (mean SNP ratio 3.4 ± 1.2 v 2.8 ± 1.2, respectively, P = 0.26, ANOVA), there was a trend however towards a higher peak SNP response in the Arabic group (5.3 ± 1.5 v 4.1 ± 1.9, respectively, P = 0.019). Conclusions: These results suggest that a significant difference exists in the endothelial function and vascular reactivity between these populations. Although the reasons for these differences are not clear, they may be related to differences in life styles, tradition, food intake, environmental and genetic factors.",
    author = "Elherik, {Khalid E.} and Faisel Khan and Belch, {Jill J. F.}",
    year = "2003",
    language = "English",
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    pages = "85--87",
    journal = "Scottish Medical Journal",
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    Differences in endothelial function and vascular reactivity between Scottish and Arabic populations. / Elherik, Khalid E.; Khan, Faisel; Belch, Jill J. F.

    In: Scottish Medical Journal, Vol. 48, No. 3, 2003, p. 85-87.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Differences in endothelial function and vascular reactivity between Scottish and Arabic populations

    AU - Elherik, Khalid E.

    AU - Khan, Faisel

    AU - Belch, Jill J. F.

    PY - 2003

    Y1 - 2003

    N2 - Background: The endothelium is a major organ that plays a central role in the regulation of blood flow, resists thrombus formation and maintains blood fluidity. Environmental, dietary, but also genetic factors might affect endothelial cell function and vascular activity. Methods and Results: Endothelium-dependent and -independent vascular responses were evaluated in 42 male subjects from two different populations: 30 Scottish and 12 Arabic (transient visitors to UK) (20-41 years old). Endothelium-dependent and -independent vascular responses were measured in the forearm skin using laser Doppler imaging after iontophoresis of increasing doses of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside, respectively. Endothelium-dependent responses were significantly greater in Arabic subjects compared with responses in Scottish subjects (mean ACh ratio 4.9 ± 1.2 v 3.8 ± 1.5, respectively, P = 0.013, ANOVA). Although there was no significant difference between the groups in endothelium-independent vascular responses (mean SNP ratio 3.4 ± 1.2 v 2.8 ± 1.2, respectively, P = 0.26, ANOVA), there was a trend however towards a higher peak SNP response in the Arabic group (5.3 ± 1.5 v 4.1 ± 1.9, respectively, P = 0.019). Conclusions: These results suggest that a significant difference exists in the endothelial function and vascular reactivity between these populations. Although the reasons for these differences are not clear, they may be related to differences in life styles, tradition, food intake, environmental and genetic factors.

    AB - Background: The endothelium is a major organ that plays a central role in the regulation of blood flow, resists thrombus formation and maintains blood fluidity. Environmental, dietary, but also genetic factors might affect endothelial cell function and vascular activity. Methods and Results: Endothelium-dependent and -independent vascular responses were evaluated in 42 male subjects from two different populations: 30 Scottish and 12 Arabic (transient visitors to UK) (20-41 years old). Endothelium-dependent and -independent vascular responses were measured in the forearm skin using laser Doppler imaging after iontophoresis of increasing doses of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside, respectively. Endothelium-dependent responses were significantly greater in Arabic subjects compared with responses in Scottish subjects (mean ACh ratio 4.9 ± 1.2 v 3.8 ± 1.5, respectively, P = 0.013, ANOVA). Although there was no significant difference between the groups in endothelium-independent vascular responses (mean SNP ratio 3.4 ± 1.2 v 2.8 ± 1.2, respectively, P = 0.26, ANOVA), there was a trend however towards a higher peak SNP response in the Arabic group (5.3 ± 1.5 v 4.1 ± 1.9, respectively, P = 0.019). Conclusions: These results suggest that a significant difference exists in the endothelial function and vascular reactivity between these populations. Although the reasons for these differences are not clear, they may be related to differences in life styles, tradition, food intake, environmental and genetic factors.

    M3 - Article

    C2 - 12968514

    VL - 48

    SP - 85

    EP - 87

    JO - Scottish Medical Journal

    JF - Scottish Medical Journal

    SN - 0036-9330

    IS - 3

    ER -