Digital Modernism and the Unfinished Performance in David Lynch's Inland Empire

Anthony Paraskeva

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Inland Empire’s digital modernism derives from a cross-pollination of cutting-edge digital production methods with the tradition of European modernism. By unmasking Laura Dern’s performance as an ongoing series of Stanislavskian rehearsals in progress, and foregrounding production methods and medium specificity in a manner recalling the radical experiments of the sixties, the film privileges the open-endedness of the unfinished performance. By emphasizing the actor’s work in building a role and experimenting with possible scenarios, Inland Empire militates against the artificially constructed Hollywood persona regularly imposed upon actors.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1-14
    Number of pages14
    JournalFilm Criticism
    Volume37
    Issue number1
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

    Fingerprint

    David Lynch
    Unmasking
    Medium Specificity
    Privilege
    Sixties
    Foregrounding
    Hollywood
    Persona
    Experiment
    Scenarios
    Rehearsal

    Cite this

    Paraskeva, Anthony. / Digital Modernism and the Unfinished Performance in David Lynch's Inland Empire. In: Film Criticism. 2012 ; Vol. 37, No. 1. pp. 1-14.
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    Digital Modernism and the Unfinished Performance in David Lynch's Inland Empire. / Paraskeva, Anthony.

    In: Film Criticism, Vol. 37, No. 1, 2012, p. 1-14.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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