Dismissing lexical competition does not make speaking any easier

a rejoinder to Mahon and Caramazza (2009)

Rasha Abdel Rahman, Alissa Melinger

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    30 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The swinging lexical network proposal (Abdel Rahman Melinger, 2009a this issue) incorporates three assumptions that are independently motivated and pre-existing in the literature. We claim that the combination of these three assumptions provides an account for a wide range of facilitation and interference observations. In their comment, Mahon and Caramazza question the success of our proposal by challenging the individual assumptions at its core. However, most of their criticisms are built on misconstruals of our proposal. Here, we revisit their points and clarify our position with regard to their specific concerns. We maintain that competition models do not necessitate an over-complication of lexical selection but rather provide an elegant and consistent mechanism to capture many empirical observations.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)749-760
    Number of pages12
    JournalLanguage and Cognitive Processes
    Volume24
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2009

    Cite this

    @article{bd00fd5f789a4faa81c88e680392ece0,
    title = "Dismissing lexical competition does not make speaking any easier: a rejoinder to Mahon and Caramazza (2009)",
    abstract = "The swinging lexical network proposal (Abdel Rahman Melinger, 2009a this issue) incorporates three assumptions that are independently motivated and pre-existing in the literature. We claim that the combination of these three assumptions provides an account for a wide range of facilitation and interference observations. In their comment, Mahon and Caramazza question the success of our proposal by challenging the individual assumptions at its core. However, most of their criticisms are built on misconstruals of our proposal. Here, we revisit their points and clarify our position with regard to their specific concerns. We maintain that competition models do not necessitate an over-complication of lexical selection but rather provide an elegant and consistent mechanism to capture many empirical observations.",
    author = "Rahman, {Rasha Abdel} and Alissa Melinger",
    year = "2009",
    doi = "10.1080/01690960802648491",
    language = "English",
    volume = "24",
    pages = "749--760",
    journal = "Language and Cognitive Processes",
    issn = "0169-0965",
    publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
    number = "5",

    }

    Dismissing lexical competition does not make speaking any easier : a rejoinder to Mahon and Caramazza (2009). / Rahman, Rasha Abdel; Melinger, Alissa.

    In: Language and Cognitive Processes, Vol. 24, No. 5, 2009, p. 749-760.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Dismissing lexical competition does not make speaking any easier

    T2 - a rejoinder to Mahon and Caramazza (2009)

    AU - Rahman, Rasha Abdel

    AU - Melinger, Alissa

    PY - 2009

    Y1 - 2009

    N2 - The swinging lexical network proposal (Abdel Rahman Melinger, 2009a this issue) incorporates three assumptions that are independently motivated and pre-existing in the literature. We claim that the combination of these three assumptions provides an account for a wide range of facilitation and interference observations. In their comment, Mahon and Caramazza question the success of our proposal by challenging the individual assumptions at its core. However, most of their criticisms are built on misconstruals of our proposal. Here, we revisit their points and clarify our position with regard to their specific concerns. We maintain that competition models do not necessitate an over-complication of lexical selection but rather provide an elegant and consistent mechanism to capture many empirical observations.

    AB - The swinging lexical network proposal (Abdel Rahman Melinger, 2009a this issue) incorporates three assumptions that are independently motivated and pre-existing in the literature. We claim that the combination of these three assumptions provides an account for a wide range of facilitation and interference observations. In their comment, Mahon and Caramazza question the success of our proposal by challenging the individual assumptions at its core. However, most of their criticisms are built on misconstruals of our proposal. Here, we revisit their points and clarify our position with regard to their specific concerns. We maintain that competition models do not necessitate an over-complication of lexical selection but rather provide an elegant and consistent mechanism to capture many empirical observations.

    U2 - 10.1080/01690960802648491

    DO - 10.1080/01690960802648491

    M3 - Article

    VL - 24

    SP - 749

    EP - 760

    JO - Language and Cognitive Processes

    JF - Language and Cognitive Processes

    SN - 0169-0965

    IS - 5

    ER -