Docemur docemus

peer-assisted learning improves the knowledge gain of tutors in the highest quartile of achievement but not those in the lowest quartile

Claire L. Donohoe, John B. Conneely, Nathan Zilbert, Martina Hennessy, Susie Schofield, John V. Reynolds (Lead / Corresponding author)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)
69 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objectives: Peer-assisted learning (PAL) is a form of collaborative learning where members of a peer group act as teachers for each other. A reciprocal PAL program was designed to investigate whether there were differential gains in knowledge acquisition among tutors compared with tutees.

Design: Bayesian statistical analysis was used to quantitatively assess the effect of tutor status on performance in a knowledge-based examination. Subgroup analysis according to student achievement and question difficulty was performed.

Participants and Setting: Final year undergraduate medical students in a 5-year degree program (n = 126).

Results: The overall probability of getting a correct answer on the knowledge examination was 49.7%. For questions on topics where a student had acted as a tutor this improved to 57.3%. However, students who performed in the upper quartile had a greater percentage gain in the probability of a correct answer in topics that they had taught vs students who performed in the lowest quartile.

Conclusions: There was demonstrable overall knowledge gain associated with acting as a tutor in a PAL program but the greatest gain occurred in students of highest academic ability.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1139-1144
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Surgical Education
Volume72
Issue number6
Early online date10 Aug 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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tutor
Learning
Students
learning
student
Peer Group
examination
Aptitude
Bayes Theorem
knowledge acquisition
peer group
learning method
Medical Students
statistical analysis
medical student
ability
teacher
knowledge
performance

Keywords

  • Medical Knowledge
  • Peer-assisted learning
  • Reciprocal
  • Surgical education
  • Tutor

Cite this

Donohoe, Claire L. ; Conneely, John B. ; Zilbert, Nathan ; Hennessy, Martina ; Schofield, Susie ; Reynolds, John V. / Docemur docemus : peer-assisted learning improves the knowledge gain of tutors in the highest quartile of achievement but not those in the lowest quartile. In: Journal of Surgical Education. 2015 ; Vol. 72, No. 6. pp. 1139-1144.
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Docemur docemus : peer-assisted learning improves the knowledge gain of tutors in the highest quartile of achievement but not those in the lowest quartile. / Donohoe, Claire L.; Conneely, John B.; Zilbert, Nathan; Hennessy, Martina; Schofield, Susie; Reynolds, John V. (Lead / Corresponding author).

In: Journal of Surgical Education, Vol. 72, No. 6, 2015, p. 1139-1144.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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