Does requiring students to produce alternative solutions promote a high quality of software design?

Janet Hughes, Steve Parkes

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The development of object-oriented design expertise requires the acquisition of a number of skills, including skill to consider tradeoffs between alternative designs. Observational studies of student learners and data logs of their CASE tool usage revealed the absence of reflective consideration of alternative designs. An experiment is described in which students were required to produce more than one design alternative: the resulting designs were scored and found to be of better quality than single designs produced by a control group. Interview and verbal protocol results were used to identify reasons for this improvement. Directions for future research are described.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings of the International Conference on Software Engineering Research and Practice, SERP '04, June 21-24, 2004, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
    EditorsHamid R. Arabnia, Hassan Reza
    PublisherCSREA Press
    Pages431-437
    Number of pages7
    Volume1
    ISBN (Print)9781932415308
    Publication statusPublished - 2004

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