Dual identities and their recognition

minority group members' perspectives

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    57 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Minorities may define themselves at a superordinate (e.g., national) level and also at a subgroup (minority) level. However, others' recognition of such dual identifications cannot be guaranteed. This paper investigates how members of a minority (Muslims in the UK) constructed their superordinate and subgroup identities in such a way as to assert a commonality with British non-Muslims whilst asserting their religious subgroup's distinctiveness. Reporting qualitative data obtained through interviews (N = 28), the analysis explores how British Muslims negotiated concerns over commonality and distinctiveness through describing themselves as being British in a Muslim way. The implications of these self-definitions for the theorization of dual identities, their recognition, and intergroup relations are discussed.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)251-270
    Number of pages20
    JournalPolitical Psychology
    Volume32
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2011

    Cite this

    @article{9906c33d0c5d43208c4e2c757b10e656,
    title = "Dual identities and their recognition: minority group members' perspectives",
    abstract = "Minorities may define themselves at a superordinate (e.g., national) level and also at a subgroup (minority) level. However, others' recognition of such dual identifications cannot be guaranteed. This paper investigates how members of a minority (Muslims in the UK) constructed their superordinate and subgroup identities in such a way as to assert a commonality with British non-Muslims whilst asserting their religious subgroup's distinctiveness. Reporting qualitative data obtained through interviews (N = 28), the analysis explores how British Muslims negotiated concerns over commonality and distinctiveness through describing themselves as being British in a Muslim way. The implications of these self-definitions for the theorization of dual identities, their recognition, and intergroup relations are discussed.",
    author = "Nick Hopkins",
    year = "2011",
    month = "4",
    doi = "10.1111/j.1467-9221.2010.00804.x",
    language = "English",
    volume = "32",
    pages = "251--270",
    journal = "Political Psychology",
    issn = "0162-895X",
    publisher = "Wiley",
    number = "2",

    }

    Dual identities and their recognition : minority group members' perspectives. / Hopkins, Nick.

    In: Political Psychology, Vol. 32, No. 2, 04.2011, p. 251-270.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Dual identities and their recognition

    T2 - minority group members' perspectives

    AU - Hopkins, Nick

    PY - 2011/4

    Y1 - 2011/4

    N2 - Minorities may define themselves at a superordinate (e.g., national) level and also at a subgroup (minority) level. However, others' recognition of such dual identifications cannot be guaranteed. This paper investigates how members of a minority (Muslims in the UK) constructed their superordinate and subgroup identities in such a way as to assert a commonality with British non-Muslims whilst asserting their religious subgroup's distinctiveness. Reporting qualitative data obtained through interviews (N = 28), the analysis explores how British Muslims negotiated concerns over commonality and distinctiveness through describing themselves as being British in a Muslim way. The implications of these self-definitions for the theorization of dual identities, their recognition, and intergroup relations are discussed.

    AB - Minorities may define themselves at a superordinate (e.g., national) level and also at a subgroup (minority) level. However, others' recognition of such dual identifications cannot be guaranteed. This paper investigates how members of a minority (Muslims in the UK) constructed their superordinate and subgroup identities in such a way as to assert a commonality with British non-Muslims whilst asserting their religious subgroup's distinctiveness. Reporting qualitative data obtained through interviews (N = 28), the analysis explores how British Muslims negotiated concerns over commonality and distinctiveness through describing themselves as being British in a Muslim way. The implications of these self-definitions for the theorization of dual identities, their recognition, and intergroup relations are discussed.

    U2 - 10.1111/j.1467-9221.2010.00804.x

    DO - 10.1111/j.1467-9221.2010.00804.x

    M3 - Article

    VL - 32

    SP - 251

    EP - 270

    JO - Political Psychology

    JF - Political Psychology

    SN - 0162-895X

    IS - 2

    ER -