E-cigarettes and head and neck cancers

A systematic review of the current literature

Susanne Flach (Lead / Corresponding author), Pavithran Maniam, Jaiganesh Manickavasagam

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoking is a well-established risk factor for head and neck (HN) cancers. Use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) is gaining popularity, being advertised as benign alternatives to tobacco. A wide variety of potentially harmful chemical components with variable quantity have been identified in e-liquids and aerosols of e-cigarettes. However, use of e-cigarettes remains controversial due to conflicting evidence.

    OBJECTIVES: We aimed to assess the association between e-cigarettes and HN cancers. We conducted a systematic review to evaluate the literature for evidence on carcinogenic effects of e-cigarettes in the pathogenesis of HN cancers.

    TYPE OF REVIEW: Qualitative systematic review.

    SEARCH STRATEGY: A PubMed/MEDLINE, Cochrane, CINAHL Plus, Trip Medical Database and Web of Science search was done for studies on e-cigarettes and HN cancer.

    EVALUATION METHOD: Abstract review of all articles, full article revision of included studies, data extraction and quality assessment were performed by two independent assessors.

    RESULTS: The literature search resulted in the identification of 359 articles. Eighteen articles were selected for inclusion into the systematic review. The majority were laboratory-based studies, followed by several cohort and case studies, representing low-level evidence. A few reports suggested DNA damage following exposure to e-cigarettes potentially due to increased oxidative stress. Flavoured e-liquids appear to be more harmful. There is variable evidence from clinical studies.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our review outlines potential dangers associated with the use of e-cigarettes and their role in HN cancers. More longitudinal and controlled studies are needed to assess the possible link between e-cigarettes and HN cancers.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)749-756
    Number of pages8
    JournalClinical Otolaryngology
    Volume44
    Issue number5
    Early online date30 May 2019
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 2019

    Fingerprint

    Head and Neck Neoplasms
    Electronic Cigarettes
    Aerosols
    PubMed
    MEDLINE
    DNA Damage
    Tobacco
    Longitudinal Studies
    Oxidative Stress
    Cohort Studies
    Smoking
    Databases

    Keywords

    • e-cigarettes
    • electronic cigarettes
    • electronic nicotine-delivery system
    • head and neck cancer
    • head and neck neoplasm
    • oral cancer
    • smoking

    Cite this

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    title = "E-cigarettes and head and neck cancers: A systematic review of the current literature",
    abstract = "BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoking is a well-established risk factor for head and neck (HN) cancers. Use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) is gaining popularity, being advertised as benign alternatives to tobacco. A wide variety of potentially harmful chemical components with variable quantity have been identified in e-liquids and aerosols of e-cigarettes. However, use of e-cigarettes remains controversial due to conflicting evidence.OBJECTIVES: We aimed to assess the association between e-cigarettes and HN cancers. We conducted a systematic review to evaluate the literature for evidence on carcinogenic effects of e-cigarettes in the pathogenesis of HN cancers.TYPE OF REVIEW: Qualitative systematic review.SEARCH STRATEGY: A PubMed/MEDLINE, Cochrane, CINAHL Plus, Trip Medical Database and Web of Science search was done for studies on e-cigarettes and HN cancer.EVALUATION METHOD: Abstract review of all articles, full article revision of included studies, data extraction and quality assessment were performed by two independent assessors.RESULTS: The literature search resulted in the identification of 359 articles. Eighteen articles were selected for inclusion into the systematic review. The majority were laboratory-based studies, followed by several cohort and case studies, representing low-level evidence. A few reports suggested DNA damage following exposure to e-cigarettes potentially due to increased oxidative stress. Flavoured e-liquids appear to be more harmful. There is variable evidence from clinical studies.CONCLUSIONS: Our review outlines potential dangers associated with the use of e-cigarettes and their role in HN cancers. More longitudinal and controlled studies are needed to assess the possible link between e-cigarettes and HN cancers.",
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    author = "Susanne Flach and Pavithran Maniam and Jaiganesh Manickavasagam",
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    E-cigarettes and head and neck cancers : A systematic review of the current literature. / Flach, Susanne (Lead / Corresponding author); Maniam, Pavithran; Manickavasagam, Jaiganesh.

    In: Clinical Otolaryngology, Vol. 44, No. 5, 09.2019, p. 749-756.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - E-cigarettes and head and neck cancers

    T2 - A systematic review of the current literature

    AU - Flach, Susanne

    AU - Maniam, Pavithran

    AU - Manickavasagam, Jaiganesh

    N1 - This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

    PY - 2019/9

    Y1 - 2019/9

    N2 - BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoking is a well-established risk factor for head and neck (HN) cancers. Use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) is gaining popularity, being advertised as benign alternatives to tobacco. A wide variety of potentially harmful chemical components with variable quantity have been identified in e-liquids and aerosols of e-cigarettes. However, use of e-cigarettes remains controversial due to conflicting evidence.OBJECTIVES: We aimed to assess the association between e-cigarettes and HN cancers. We conducted a systematic review to evaluate the literature for evidence on carcinogenic effects of e-cigarettes in the pathogenesis of HN cancers.TYPE OF REVIEW: Qualitative systematic review.SEARCH STRATEGY: A PubMed/MEDLINE, Cochrane, CINAHL Plus, Trip Medical Database and Web of Science search was done for studies on e-cigarettes and HN cancer.EVALUATION METHOD: Abstract review of all articles, full article revision of included studies, data extraction and quality assessment were performed by two independent assessors.RESULTS: The literature search resulted in the identification of 359 articles. Eighteen articles were selected for inclusion into the systematic review. The majority were laboratory-based studies, followed by several cohort and case studies, representing low-level evidence. A few reports suggested DNA damage following exposure to e-cigarettes potentially due to increased oxidative stress. Flavoured e-liquids appear to be more harmful. There is variable evidence from clinical studies.CONCLUSIONS: Our review outlines potential dangers associated with the use of e-cigarettes and their role in HN cancers. More longitudinal and controlled studies are needed to assess the possible link between e-cigarettes and HN cancers.

    AB - BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoking is a well-established risk factor for head and neck (HN) cancers. Use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) is gaining popularity, being advertised as benign alternatives to tobacco. A wide variety of potentially harmful chemical components with variable quantity have been identified in e-liquids and aerosols of e-cigarettes. However, use of e-cigarettes remains controversial due to conflicting evidence.OBJECTIVES: We aimed to assess the association between e-cigarettes and HN cancers. We conducted a systematic review to evaluate the literature for evidence on carcinogenic effects of e-cigarettes in the pathogenesis of HN cancers.TYPE OF REVIEW: Qualitative systematic review.SEARCH STRATEGY: A PubMed/MEDLINE, Cochrane, CINAHL Plus, Trip Medical Database and Web of Science search was done for studies on e-cigarettes and HN cancer.EVALUATION METHOD: Abstract review of all articles, full article revision of included studies, data extraction and quality assessment were performed by two independent assessors.RESULTS: The literature search resulted in the identification of 359 articles. Eighteen articles were selected for inclusion into the systematic review. The majority were laboratory-based studies, followed by several cohort and case studies, representing low-level evidence. A few reports suggested DNA damage following exposure to e-cigarettes potentially due to increased oxidative stress. Flavoured e-liquids appear to be more harmful. There is variable evidence from clinical studies.CONCLUSIONS: Our review outlines potential dangers associated with the use of e-cigarettes and their role in HN cancers. More longitudinal and controlled studies are needed to assess the possible link between e-cigarettes and HN cancers.

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    KW - electronic cigarettes

    KW - electronic nicotine-delivery system

    KW - head and neck cancer

    KW - head and neck neoplasm

    KW - oral cancer

    KW - smoking

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    U2 - 10.1111/coa.13384

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    JO - Clinical Otolaryngology

    JF - Clinical Otolaryngology

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