Early developmental milestones in adult schizophrenia and other psychoses: a 31-year follow-up of the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort

M. Isohanni (Lead / Corresponding author), P. B. Jones, K. Moilanen, P. Rantakallio, J. Veijola, H. Oja, M. Koiranen, J. Jokelainen, T. Croudace, M-R. Järvelin

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    131 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Delayed childhood development may precede adult psychoses. We tested this hypothesis in a large, general population birth cohort (n=12058) followed to age 31 years. The ages at which individuals learned to stand, walk, speak, and became potty-trained (bowel control) and dry (bladder control), were recorded at a 1-year examination. Psychiatric outcome was ascertained through linkage to a national hospital discharge register. Cumulative incidence of DSM-III-R schizophrenia, other psychoses and non-psychotic disorders were stratified according to the timing of milestones and compared within the cohort using internal standardization. 100 cases of DSM-III-R schizophrenia, 55 other psychoses, and 315 non-psychotic disorders were identified. The ages at learning to stand, walk and become potty-trained were each related to subsequent incidence of schizophrenia and other psychoses. Compared with the whole cohort, earlier milestones reduced, and later milestones increased, the risk in a linear manner. These developmental effects were not seen for non-psychotic outcomes. The findings support hypotheses regarding psychosis as having a developmental dimension with precursors apparent in early life.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1-19
    Number of pages19
    JournalSchizophrenia Research
    Volume52
    Issue number1-2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Oct 2001

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