Early life antibiotic use and the risk of asthma and asthma exacerbations in children

Fariba Ahmadizar, Susanne J. H. Vijverberg, Hubertus G. M. Arets, Anthonius de Boer, Steve Turner, Graham Devereux, Ali Arabkhazaeli, Patricia Soares, Somnath Mukhopadhyay, Johan Garssen, Colin N. A. Palmer, Johan C. de Jongste, Vincent W. V. Jaddoe, Liesbeth Duijts, Evelien R. van Meel, Aletta D. Kraneveld, Anke H. Maitland-van der Zee (Lead / Corresponding author)

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Abstract

Background: The use of antibiotic therapy early in life might influence the risk of developing asthma. Studies assessing the influence of early life antibiotic use on the risk of asthma exacerbations are limited, and the results are inconsistent. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the association between use of antibiotic during the first three years of life and the risk of developing childhood asthma and the occurrence of asthma exacerbations.

Methods: Data from four large childhood cohorts were used; two population-based cohorts to study the risk of developing asthma: Generation R (n=7,393, the Netherlands) and SEATON (n=891, Scotland, UK), and two asthma cohorts to assess the risk of asthma exacerbations: PACMAN (n=668, the Netherlands) and BREATHE (n=806, Scotland, UK). Odds ratios (ORs) were derived from logistic regression analysis within each database followed by pooling the results using a fixed- or random-effect model.

Results: Antibiotic use in early life was associated with an increased risk of asthma in a meta-analysis of the Generation R and SEATON data (OR: 2.18, 95% CI: 1.04-4.60; I(2) : 76.3%). There was no association between antibiotic use in early life and risk of asthma exacerbations later in life in a meta-analysis of the PACMAN and BREATHE data (OR: 0.93, 95% CI: 0.65-1.32; I(2) : 0.0%).

Conclusion: Children treated with antibiotic in the first three years of life are more likely to develop asthma, but there is no evidence that the exposure to antibiotic is associated with increased risk of asthma exacerbations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)430-437
Number of pages8
JournalPediatric Allergy and Immunology
Volume28
Issue number5
Early online date19 Apr 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2017

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Asthma
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Odds Ratio
Scotland
Netherlands
Meta-Analysis
Cohort Studies
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Databases
Population

Keywords

  • Antibiotic
  • Asthma
  • Asthma exacerbations
  • Early life
  • Pediatrics

Cite this

Ahmadizar, F., Vijverberg, S. J. H., Arets, H. G. M., de Boer, A., Turner, S., Devereux, G., ... Maitland-van der Zee, A. H. (2017). Early life antibiotic use and the risk of asthma and asthma exacerbations in children. Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, 28(5), 430-437. https://doi.org/10.1111/pai.12725
Ahmadizar, Fariba ; Vijverberg, Susanne J. H. ; Arets, Hubertus G. M. ; de Boer, Anthonius ; Turner, Steve ; Devereux, Graham ; Arabkhazaeli, Ali ; Soares, Patricia ; Mukhopadhyay, Somnath ; Garssen, Johan ; Palmer, Colin N. A. ; de Jongste, Johan C. ; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V. ; Duijts, Liesbeth ; van Meel, Evelien R. ; Kraneveld, Aletta D. ; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke H. / Early life antibiotic use and the risk of asthma and asthma exacerbations in children. In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology. 2017 ; Vol. 28, No. 5. pp. 430-437.
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title = "Early life antibiotic use and the risk of asthma and asthma exacerbations in children",
abstract = "Background: The use of antibiotic therapy early in life might influence the risk of developing asthma. Studies assessing the influence of early life antibiotic use on the risk of asthma exacerbations are limited, and the results are inconsistent. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the association between use of antibiotic during the first three years of life and the risk of developing childhood asthma and the occurrence of asthma exacerbations.Methods: Data from four large childhood cohorts were used; two population-based cohorts to study the risk of developing asthma: Generation R (n=7,393, the Netherlands) and SEATON (n=891, Scotland, UK), and two asthma cohorts to assess the risk of asthma exacerbations: PACMAN (n=668, the Netherlands) and BREATHE (n=806, Scotland, UK). Odds ratios (ORs) were derived from logistic regression analysis within each database followed by pooling the results using a fixed- or random-effect model.Results: Antibiotic use in early life was associated with an increased risk of asthma in a meta-analysis of the Generation R and SEATON data (OR: 2.18, 95{\%} CI: 1.04-4.60; I(2) : 76.3{\%}). There was no association between antibiotic use in early life and risk of asthma exacerbations later in life in a meta-analysis of the PACMAN and BREATHE data (OR: 0.93, 95{\%} CI: 0.65-1.32; I(2) : 0.0{\%}).Conclusion: Children treated with antibiotic in the first three years of life are more likely to develop asthma, but there is no evidence that the exposure to antibiotic is associated with increased risk of asthma exacerbations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "Antibiotic, Asthma, Asthma exacerbations, Early life, Pediatrics",
author = "Fariba Ahmadizar and Vijverberg, {Susanne J. H.} and Arets, {Hubertus G. M.} and {de Boer}, Anthonius and Steve Turner and Graham Devereux and Ali Arabkhazaeli and Patricia Soares and Somnath Mukhopadhyay and Johan Garssen and Palmer, {Colin N. A.} and {de Jongste}, {Johan C.} and Jaddoe, {Vincent W. V.} and Liesbeth Duijts and {van Meel}, {Evelien R.} and Kraneveld, {Aletta D.} and {Maitland-van der Zee}, {Anke H.}",
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Ahmadizar, F, Vijverberg, SJH, Arets, HGM, de Boer, A, Turner, S, Devereux, G, Arabkhazaeli, A, Soares, P, Mukhopadhyay, S, Garssen, J, Palmer, CNA, de Jongste, JC, Jaddoe, VWV, Duijts, L, van Meel, ER, Kraneveld, AD & Maitland-van der Zee, AH 2017, 'Early life antibiotic use and the risk of asthma and asthma exacerbations in children', Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, vol. 28, no. 5, pp. 430-437. https://doi.org/10.1111/pai.12725

Early life antibiotic use and the risk of asthma and asthma exacerbations in children. / Ahmadizar, Fariba; Vijverberg, Susanne J. H.; Arets, Hubertus G. M.; de Boer, Anthonius; Turner, Steve; Devereux, Graham; Arabkhazaeli, Ali; Soares, Patricia; Mukhopadhyay, Somnath; Garssen, Johan; Palmer, Colin N. A.; de Jongste, Johan C.; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Duijts, Liesbeth; van Meel, Evelien R.; Kraneveld, Aletta D.; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke H. (Lead / Corresponding author).

In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, Vol. 28, No. 5, 08.2017, p. 430-437.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Early life antibiotic use and the risk of asthma and asthma exacerbations in children

AU - Ahmadizar, Fariba

AU - Vijverberg, Susanne J. H.

AU - Arets, Hubertus G. M.

AU - de Boer, Anthonius

AU - Turner, Steve

AU - Devereux, Graham

AU - Arabkhazaeli, Ali

AU - Soares, Patricia

AU - Mukhopadhyay, Somnath

AU - Garssen, Johan

AU - Palmer, Colin N. A.

AU - de Jongste, Johan C.

AU - Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.

AU - Duijts, Liesbeth

AU - van Meel, Evelien R.

AU - Kraneveld, Aletta D.

AU - Maitland-van der Zee, Anke H.

N1 - No funding source had any role in the design and conduct of the study, the collection, management, analysis and interpretation of the data or the preparation, review or approval of the manuscript.

PY - 2017/8

Y1 - 2017/8

N2 - Background: The use of antibiotic therapy early in life might influence the risk of developing asthma. Studies assessing the influence of early life antibiotic use on the risk of asthma exacerbations are limited, and the results are inconsistent. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the association between use of antibiotic during the first three years of life and the risk of developing childhood asthma and the occurrence of asthma exacerbations.Methods: Data from four large childhood cohorts were used; two population-based cohorts to study the risk of developing asthma: Generation R (n=7,393, the Netherlands) and SEATON (n=891, Scotland, UK), and two asthma cohorts to assess the risk of asthma exacerbations: PACMAN (n=668, the Netherlands) and BREATHE (n=806, Scotland, UK). Odds ratios (ORs) were derived from logistic regression analysis within each database followed by pooling the results using a fixed- or random-effect model.Results: Antibiotic use in early life was associated with an increased risk of asthma in a meta-analysis of the Generation R and SEATON data (OR: 2.18, 95% CI: 1.04-4.60; I(2) : 76.3%). There was no association between antibiotic use in early life and risk of asthma exacerbations later in life in a meta-analysis of the PACMAN and BREATHE data (OR: 0.93, 95% CI: 0.65-1.32; I(2) : 0.0%).Conclusion: Children treated with antibiotic in the first three years of life are more likely to develop asthma, but there is no evidence that the exposure to antibiotic is associated with increased risk of asthma exacerbations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

AB - Background: The use of antibiotic therapy early in life might influence the risk of developing asthma. Studies assessing the influence of early life antibiotic use on the risk of asthma exacerbations are limited, and the results are inconsistent. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the association between use of antibiotic during the first three years of life and the risk of developing childhood asthma and the occurrence of asthma exacerbations.Methods: Data from four large childhood cohorts were used; two population-based cohorts to study the risk of developing asthma: Generation R (n=7,393, the Netherlands) and SEATON (n=891, Scotland, UK), and two asthma cohorts to assess the risk of asthma exacerbations: PACMAN (n=668, the Netherlands) and BREATHE (n=806, Scotland, UK). Odds ratios (ORs) were derived from logistic regression analysis within each database followed by pooling the results using a fixed- or random-effect model.Results: Antibiotic use in early life was associated with an increased risk of asthma in a meta-analysis of the Generation R and SEATON data (OR: 2.18, 95% CI: 1.04-4.60; I(2) : 76.3%). There was no association between antibiotic use in early life and risk of asthma exacerbations later in life in a meta-analysis of the PACMAN and BREATHE data (OR: 0.93, 95% CI: 0.65-1.32; I(2) : 0.0%).Conclusion: Children treated with antibiotic in the first three years of life are more likely to develop asthma, but there is no evidence that the exposure to antibiotic is associated with increased risk of asthma exacerbations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

KW - Antibiotic

KW - Asthma

KW - Asthma exacerbations

KW - Early life

KW - Pediatrics

U2 - 10.1111/pai.12725

DO - 10.1111/pai.12725

M3 - Article

VL - 28

SP - 430

EP - 437

JO - Pediatric Allergy and Immunology

JF - Pediatric Allergy and Immunology

SN - 0905-6157

IS - 5

ER -

Ahmadizar F, Vijverberg SJH, Arets HGM, de Boer A, Turner S, Devereux G et al. Early life antibiotic use and the risk of asthma and asthma exacerbations in children. Pediatric Allergy and Immunology. 2017 Aug;28(5):430-437. https://doi.org/10.1111/pai.12725