Early versus delayed initiation of breastfeeding

M. J. Renfrew, S. Lang, M. W. Woolridge

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    23 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND:
    It has been suggested that the timing of a baby's first breastfeed may influence breastfeeding duration and emotional attachment.
    OBJECTIVES:
    The objective of this review was to assess the effects of breastfeeding soon after birth (within 30 minutes) compared to being breastfed later (between 4 to 8 hours after delivery) on the duration of breastfeeding and the mother/infant relationship.
    SEARCH STRATEGY:
    We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group trials register.
    SELECTION CRITERIA:
    Randomised and quasi-randomised trials comparing early skin contact and breastfeeding with late skin contact and breastfeeding in women intending to breastfeed their healthy term infant.
    DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS:
    Data were extracted by two reviewers.
    MAIN RESULTS:
    Three studies involving 209 women were included. Compared with late contact and breastfeeding, early contact and breastfeeding was associated with greater communication between mother and infants in a two minute observation period (odds ratio 0.14, 95% confidence interval 0.03 to 0.61). There was no difference detected for numbers of women breastfeeding after birth (odds ratio for 12 weeks after birth 0.73, 95% confidence interval 0.34 to 1.54).
    REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS:
    No differences were found between early and delayed contact in regard to breastfeeding duration. Early contact was associated with greater communication between mothers and infants.
    Original languageEnglish
    Article numberCD000043
    JournalCochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2000

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