Education and training of healthcare staff in the knowledge, attitudes and skills needed to work effectively with breastfeeding women: a systematic review

Anna Gavine (Lead / Corresponding author), Steve MacGillivray, Mary J. Renfrew, Lindsay Siebelt, Haggi Michael Haggi, Alison McFadden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Current evidence suggests that women need effective support to breastfeed, but many healthcare staff lack the necessary knowledge, attitudes and skills. There is therefore a need for breastfeeding education and training for healthcare staff. The primary aim of this review is to determine whether education and training programs for healthcare staff have an effect on their knowledge and attitudes about supporting breastfeeding women. The secondary aim of this review was to identify whether any differences in type of training or discipline of staff mattered.

Methods: A systematic search of the literature was conducted using the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s trial register. Randomised controlled trials comparing breastfeeding education and training for healthcare staff with no or usual training and education were included if they measured the impact on staff knowledge, attitudes or compliance with the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI).

Results: From the 1192 reports identified, four distinct studies were included. Three studies were two-arm cluster-randomised trials and one was a two-arm individual randomised trial. Of these, three contributed quantitative data from a total of 250 participants. Due to heterogeneity of outcome measures meta-analysis was not possible. Knowledge was included as an outcome in two studies and demonstrated small but significant positive effects. Attitudes towards breastfeeding was included as an outcome in two studies, however, results were inconsistent both in terms of how they were measured and the intervention effects. One study reported a small but significant positive effect on BFHI compliance. Study quality was generally deemed low with the majority of domains being judged as high or unclear risk of bias.

Conclusions: This review identified a lack of good evidence on breastfeeding education and training for healthcare staff. There is therefore a critical need for research to address breastfeeding education and training needs of multidisciplinary healthcare staff in different contexts through large, well-conducted RCTs.
Original languageEnglish
Article number6
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Breastfeeding Journal
Volume12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Feb 2017

Fingerprint

Breast Feeding
Delivery of Health Care
Education
Attitude of Health Personnel
Compliance
Meta-Analysis
Randomized Controlled Trials
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Parturition
Pregnancy
Research

Keywords

  • Breastfeeding
  • Healthcare staff
  • Support
  • Education
  • Training
  • Knowledge
  • Attitudes

Cite this

@article{b643982b745d42bdb57a5fe19b0401f5,
title = "Education and training of healthcare staff in the knowledge, attitudes and skills needed to work effectively with breastfeeding women: a systematic review",
abstract = "Background: Current evidence suggests that women need effective support to breastfeed, but many healthcare staff lack the necessary knowledge, attitudes and skills. There is therefore a need for breastfeeding education and training for healthcare staff. The primary aim of this review is to determine whether education and training programs for healthcare staff have an effect on their knowledge and attitudes about supporting breastfeeding women. The secondary aim of this review was to identify whether any differences in type of training or discipline of staff mattered.Methods: A systematic search of the literature was conducted using the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s trial register. Randomised controlled trials comparing breastfeeding education and training for healthcare staff with no or usual training and education were included if they measured the impact on staff knowledge, attitudes or compliance with the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI).Results: From the 1192 reports identified, four distinct studies were included. Three studies were two-arm cluster-randomised trials and one was a two-arm individual randomised trial. Of these, three contributed quantitative data from a total of 250 participants. Due to heterogeneity of outcome measures meta-analysis was not possible. Knowledge was included as an outcome in two studies and demonstrated small but significant positive effects. Attitudes towards breastfeeding was included as an outcome in two studies, however, results were inconsistent both in terms of how they were measured and the intervention effects. One study reported a small but significant positive effect on BFHI compliance. Study quality was generally deemed low with the majority of domains being judged as high or unclear risk of bias.Conclusions: This review identified a lack of good evidence on breastfeeding education and training for healthcare staff. There is therefore a critical need for research to address breastfeeding education and training needs of multidisciplinary healthcare staff in different contexts through large, well-conducted RCTs.",
keywords = "Breastfeeding, Healthcare staff, Support , Education , Training, Knowledge , Attitudes",
author = "Anna Gavine and Steve MacGillivray and Renfrew, {Mary J.} and Lindsay Siebelt and Haggi, {Haggi Michael} and Alison McFadden",
note = "This work was commissioned by the World Health Organization to inform the work of the WHO guideline development group on nutrition actions 2016–2018.",
year = "2017",
month = "2",
day = "2",
doi = "10.1186/s13006-016-0097-2",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "1--10",
journal = "International Breastfeeding Journal",
issn = "1746-4358",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",

}

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T1 - Education and training of healthcare staff in the knowledge, attitudes and skills needed to work effectively with breastfeeding women

T2 - a systematic review

AU - Gavine, Anna

AU - MacGillivray, Steve

AU - Renfrew, Mary J.

AU - Siebelt, Lindsay

AU - Haggi, Haggi Michael

AU - McFadden, Alison

N1 - This work was commissioned by the World Health Organization to inform the work of the WHO guideline development group on nutrition actions 2016–2018.

PY - 2017/2/2

Y1 - 2017/2/2

N2 - Background: Current evidence suggests that women need effective support to breastfeed, but many healthcare staff lack the necessary knowledge, attitudes and skills. There is therefore a need for breastfeeding education and training for healthcare staff. The primary aim of this review is to determine whether education and training programs for healthcare staff have an effect on their knowledge and attitudes about supporting breastfeeding women. The secondary aim of this review was to identify whether any differences in type of training or discipline of staff mattered.Methods: A systematic search of the literature was conducted using the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s trial register. Randomised controlled trials comparing breastfeeding education and training for healthcare staff with no or usual training and education were included if they measured the impact on staff knowledge, attitudes or compliance with the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI).Results: From the 1192 reports identified, four distinct studies were included. Three studies were two-arm cluster-randomised trials and one was a two-arm individual randomised trial. Of these, three contributed quantitative data from a total of 250 participants. Due to heterogeneity of outcome measures meta-analysis was not possible. Knowledge was included as an outcome in two studies and demonstrated small but significant positive effects. Attitudes towards breastfeeding was included as an outcome in two studies, however, results were inconsistent both in terms of how they were measured and the intervention effects. One study reported a small but significant positive effect on BFHI compliance. Study quality was generally deemed low with the majority of domains being judged as high or unclear risk of bias.Conclusions: This review identified a lack of good evidence on breastfeeding education and training for healthcare staff. There is therefore a critical need for research to address breastfeeding education and training needs of multidisciplinary healthcare staff in different contexts through large, well-conducted RCTs.

AB - Background: Current evidence suggests that women need effective support to breastfeed, but many healthcare staff lack the necessary knowledge, attitudes and skills. There is therefore a need for breastfeeding education and training for healthcare staff. The primary aim of this review is to determine whether education and training programs for healthcare staff have an effect on their knowledge and attitudes about supporting breastfeeding women. The secondary aim of this review was to identify whether any differences in type of training or discipline of staff mattered.Methods: A systematic search of the literature was conducted using the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s trial register. Randomised controlled trials comparing breastfeeding education and training for healthcare staff with no or usual training and education were included if they measured the impact on staff knowledge, attitudes or compliance with the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI).Results: From the 1192 reports identified, four distinct studies were included. Three studies were two-arm cluster-randomised trials and one was a two-arm individual randomised trial. Of these, three contributed quantitative data from a total of 250 participants. Due to heterogeneity of outcome measures meta-analysis was not possible. Knowledge was included as an outcome in two studies and demonstrated small but significant positive effects. Attitudes towards breastfeeding was included as an outcome in two studies, however, results were inconsistent both in terms of how they were measured and the intervention effects. One study reported a small but significant positive effect on BFHI compliance. Study quality was generally deemed low with the majority of domains being judged as high or unclear risk of bias.Conclusions: This review identified a lack of good evidence on breastfeeding education and training for healthcare staff. There is therefore a critical need for research to address breastfeeding education and training needs of multidisciplinary healthcare staff in different contexts through large, well-conducted RCTs.

KW - Breastfeeding

KW - Healthcare staff

KW - Support

KW - Education

KW - Training

KW - Knowledge

KW - Attitudes

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DO - 10.1186/s13006-016-0097-2

M3 - Article

C2 - 28167998

VL - 12

SP - 1

EP - 10

JO - International Breastfeeding Journal

JF - International Breastfeeding Journal

SN - 1746-4358

M1 - 6

ER -