Educational psychologists as researchers

Keith Topping, Fraser Lauchlan

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The role of educational (school) psychologists around the world is often debated, and usually involves the discussion of many key functions. Traditionally, the role has focused on the importance of cognitive assessment; however, increasingly this role is gradually being marginalised in favour of other more generic and systemic activities, such as research. This article will outline the importance of research in the role of educational psychologists, and will consider how this role can be fostered across the profession in order to meet the demands of the educational marketplace, thus ensuring that the profession of educational psychology will survive well into the 21st century. Implications for the organisation of psychological services are also discussed, as well as implications for the training of educational psychologists.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)74-83
    Number of pages10
    JournalAustralian Educational and Developmental Psychologist
    Volume30
    Issue number1
    Early online date19 Jun 2013
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jul 2013

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    Research Personnel
    Psychology
    Educational Psychology
    Research

    Cite this

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    Educational psychologists as researchers. / Topping, Keith; Lauchlan, Fraser.

    In: Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, Vol. 30, No. 1, 07.2013, p. 74-83.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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