Effect of social deprivation on mortality and the duration of hospital stay after a stroke

K. Y. K. Wong, S. Y. S. Wong, H. W. Fraser, Y. Ersoy, S. Ogston, D. Wolfson, M. Malek, A. D. Struthers, H. Tunstall-Pedoe, R. S. MacWalter (Lead / Corresponding author)

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    Abstract

    Background: We aim to assess whether social deprivation independently predicts case fatality after a stroke patient has been admitted to hospital, and to assess whether social deprivation affected duration of hospital stay. Methods: Cohort study in a tertiary teaching hospital included consecutive patients admitted to hospital within 48 h of their stroke between 1988 and 1994. Outcome measures were case fatality at 1 year and length of hospital stay. The socioeconomiccategory was derived from the postcode sectorof residence for the patients (Carstairs index). Cause of death was determined by data linkage to the Registrar General data for Scotland. Results: 2,042 stroke patients were included. A significant age difference existed between the deprivation categories (76.0 ± 10.9 years in the affluent cohort vs. 71.4 ± 10.7 years in the deprived cohort). Smoking was more common in the deprived group. ECG findings and neurological score on admission were similar between the groups. No difference existed between groups for length of hospital stay (p = 0.793), and in the proportions remaining alive at 1 year (p = 0.416). When entered into a multivariate Cox regression analysis, the deprivation categories did not predict mortality. Age, sex, Philadelphia Geriatric Center Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) Scale Score, Orgogozo neurological score on admission, and ECG abnormalities were the significant predictors. Conclusions: Stroke patients living in more socially deprived areas had their strokes at an earlier age but were not at a greater risk of dying or longer hospital stay once they had been admitted to hospital.

    Copyright © 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)251-257
    Number of pages7
    JournalCerebrovascular Diseases
    Volume22
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2006

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    Length of Stay
    Stroke
    Mortality
    Electrocardiography
    Information Storage and Retrieval
    Scotland
    Activities of Daily Living
    Tertiary Care Centers
    Teaching Hospitals
    Geriatrics
    Cause of Death
    Cohort Studies
    Smoking
    Regression Analysis
    Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

    Cite this

    Wong, K. Y. K., Wong, S. Y. S., Fraser, H. W., Ersoy, Y., Ogston, S., Wolfson, D., ... MacWalter, R. S. (2006). Effect of social deprivation on mortality and the duration of hospital stay after a stroke. Cerebrovascular Diseases, 22(4), 251-257. https://doi.org/10.1159/000094012
    Wong, K. Y. K. ; Wong, S. Y. S. ; Fraser, H. W. ; Ersoy, Y. ; Ogston, S. ; Wolfson, D. ; Malek, M. ; Struthers, A. D. ; Tunstall-Pedoe, H. ; MacWalter, R. S. / Effect of social deprivation on mortality and the duration of hospital stay after a stroke. In: Cerebrovascular Diseases. 2006 ; Vol. 22, No. 4. pp. 251-257.
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    title = "Effect of social deprivation on mortality and the duration of hospital stay after a stroke",
    abstract = "Background: We aim to assess whether social deprivation independently predicts case fatality after a stroke patient has been admitted to hospital, and to assess whether social deprivation affected duration of hospital stay. Methods: Cohort study in a tertiary teaching hospital included consecutive patients admitted to hospital within 48 h of their stroke between 1988 and 1994. Outcome measures were case fatality at 1 year and length of hospital stay. The socioeconomiccategory was derived from the postcode sectorof residence for the patients (Carstairs index). Cause of death was determined by data linkage to the Registrar General data for Scotland. Results: 2,042 stroke patients were included. A significant age difference existed between the deprivation categories (76.0 ± 10.9 years in the affluent cohort vs. 71.4 ± 10.7 years in the deprived cohort). Smoking was more common in the deprived group. ECG findings and neurological score on admission were similar between the groups. No difference existed between groups for length of hospital stay (p = 0.793), and in the proportions remaining alive at 1 year (p = 0.416). When entered into a multivariate Cox regression analysis, the deprivation categories did not predict mortality. Age, sex, Philadelphia Geriatric Center Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) Scale Score, Orgogozo neurological score on admission, and ECG abnormalities were the significant predictors. Conclusions: Stroke patients living in more socially deprived areas had their strokes at an earlier age but were not at a greater risk of dying or longer hospital stay once they had been admitted to hospital.Copyright {\circledC} 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel",
    author = "Wong, {K. Y. K.} and Wong, {S. Y. S.} and Fraser, {H. W.} and Y. Ersoy and S. Ogston and D. Wolfson and M. Malek and Struthers, {A. D.} and H. Tunstall-Pedoe and MacWalter, {R. S.}",
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    Wong, KYK, Wong, SYS, Fraser, HW, Ersoy, Y, Ogston, S, Wolfson, D, Malek, M, Struthers, AD, Tunstall-Pedoe, H & MacWalter, RS 2006, 'Effect of social deprivation on mortality and the duration of hospital stay after a stroke', Cerebrovascular Diseases, vol. 22, no. 4, pp. 251-257. https://doi.org/10.1159/000094012

    Effect of social deprivation on mortality and the duration of hospital stay after a stroke. / Wong, K. Y. K.; Wong, S. Y. S.; Fraser, H. W.; Ersoy, Y.; Ogston, S.; Wolfson, D.; Malek, M.; Struthers, A. D.; Tunstall-Pedoe, H.; MacWalter, R. S. (Lead / Corresponding author).

    In: Cerebrovascular Diseases, Vol. 22, No. 4, 2006, p. 251-257.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Effect of social deprivation on mortality and the duration of hospital stay after a stroke

    AU - Wong, K. Y. K.

    AU - Wong, S. Y. S.

    AU - Fraser, H. W.

    AU - Ersoy, Y.

    AU - Ogston, S.

    AU - Wolfson, D.

    AU - Malek, M.

    AU - Struthers, A. D.

    AU - Tunstall-Pedoe, H.

    AU - MacWalter, R. S.

    N1 - Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

    PY - 2006

    Y1 - 2006

    N2 - Background: We aim to assess whether social deprivation independently predicts case fatality after a stroke patient has been admitted to hospital, and to assess whether social deprivation affected duration of hospital stay. Methods: Cohort study in a tertiary teaching hospital included consecutive patients admitted to hospital within 48 h of their stroke between 1988 and 1994. Outcome measures were case fatality at 1 year and length of hospital stay. The socioeconomiccategory was derived from the postcode sectorof residence for the patients (Carstairs index). Cause of death was determined by data linkage to the Registrar General data for Scotland. Results: 2,042 stroke patients were included. A significant age difference existed between the deprivation categories (76.0 ± 10.9 years in the affluent cohort vs. 71.4 ± 10.7 years in the deprived cohort). Smoking was more common in the deprived group. ECG findings and neurological score on admission were similar between the groups. No difference existed between groups for length of hospital stay (p = 0.793), and in the proportions remaining alive at 1 year (p = 0.416). When entered into a multivariate Cox regression analysis, the deprivation categories did not predict mortality. Age, sex, Philadelphia Geriatric Center Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) Scale Score, Orgogozo neurological score on admission, and ECG abnormalities were the significant predictors. Conclusions: Stroke patients living in more socially deprived areas had their strokes at an earlier age but were not at a greater risk of dying or longer hospital stay once they had been admitted to hospital.Copyright © 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel

    AB - Background: We aim to assess whether social deprivation independently predicts case fatality after a stroke patient has been admitted to hospital, and to assess whether social deprivation affected duration of hospital stay. Methods: Cohort study in a tertiary teaching hospital included consecutive patients admitted to hospital within 48 h of their stroke between 1988 and 1994. Outcome measures were case fatality at 1 year and length of hospital stay. The socioeconomiccategory was derived from the postcode sectorof residence for the patients (Carstairs index). Cause of death was determined by data linkage to the Registrar General data for Scotland. Results: 2,042 stroke patients were included. A significant age difference existed between the deprivation categories (76.0 ± 10.9 years in the affluent cohort vs. 71.4 ± 10.7 years in the deprived cohort). Smoking was more common in the deprived group. ECG findings and neurological score on admission were similar between the groups. No difference existed between groups for length of hospital stay (p = 0.793), and in the proportions remaining alive at 1 year (p = 0.416). When entered into a multivariate Cox regression analysis, the deprivation categories did not predict mortality. Age, sex, Philadelphia Geriatric Center Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) Scale Score, Orgogozo neurological score on admission, and ECG abnormalities were the significant predictors. Conclusions: Stroke patients living in more socially deprived areas had their strokes at an earlier age but were not at a greater risk of dying or longer hospital stay once they had been admitted to hospital.Copyright © 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel

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