Effects of smoking cessation on lung function and airway inflammation in smokers with asthma

Rekha Chaudhuri, Eric Livingston, Alex D. McMahon, Jane Lafferty, Iona Fraser, Mark Spears, Charles P. McSharry, Neil C. Thomson (Lead / Corresponding author)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

258 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rationale: Active smoking in asthma is associated with worsening of symptoms, accelerated decline in lung function, and impaired response to corticosteroids. Objectives: To examine the short-term effects of smoking cessation on lung function, airway inflammation, and corticosteroid responsiveness in smokers with asthma. Methods and Measurements: Smokers with asthma were given the option to quit or continue smoking. Both groups underwent spirometry and induced sputum at baseline and at 1, 3, and 6 wk. Cutaneous vasoconstrictor response to topical beclometasone, airway response to oral prednisolone, and sensitivity of peripheral blood lymphocytes to corticosteroids were measured before smoking cessation and at 6 wk. Main Results: Of 32 subjects recruited, 11 opted to continue smoking (smoking control group). Of 21 subjects who opted for smoking cessation, 10 quit smoking for 6 wk (quit group). In the comparison of quitters with smokers at 6 wk, the mean (confidence interval [CI]) difference in FEV1 was 407 ml (21, 793), p = 0.040, and the proportion of sputum neutrophils was reduced by 29 (51, 8), p = 0.039. Total cutaneous vasoconstrictor response score to topical beclometasone improved after smoking cessation with a mean (CI) difference of 3.56 (0.84, 6.28), p = 0.042, between quitters and smokers. There was no change in airway corticosteroid responses after smoking cessation. Conclusions: By 6 wk after smoking cessation, subjects who quit smoking had achieved considerable improvement in lung function and a fall in sputum neutrophil count compared with subjects who continued to smoke. These findings highlight the importance of smoking cessation in asthma.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)127-133
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Volume174
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Apr 2006

Keywords

  • Airway inflammation
  • Asthma
  • Lung function
  • Smoking
  • Smoking cessation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Effects of smoking cessation on lung function and airway inflammation in smokers with asthma'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this