Elevated CO2 effects on nitrogen assimilation and growth of C3 vascular plants are similar regardless of N-form assimilated

Mitchell Andrews, Leo M. Condron, Peter D. Kemp, Jennifer F. Topping, Keith Lindsey, Simon Hodge, John A. Raven

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) increased from around 280 ppm in 1750 to 400 ppm in 2016 and is likely to continue to increase throughout this century. It has been argued that wheat, Arabidopsis, and C3 plants in general respond more positively to elevated atmospheric [CO2] under ammonium (NH4+) nutrition than under nitrate (NO3-) nutrition because elevated CO2 inhibits their photoreduction of NO3- and hence reduces their total plant nitrogen (N) assimilation and ultimately growth. Here, it is argued that the weight of evidence in the literature indicates that elevated atmospheric [CO2] does not inhibit NO3- assimilation and growth of C3 vascular plants. New data for common bean and wheat support this view and indicate that the effects of elevated atmospheric [CO2] on N assimilation and growth of C3 vascular plants will be similar regardless of the form of N assimilated.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article numberery371
    Pages (from-to)683-690
    Number of pages8
    JournalJournal of Experimental Botany
    Volume70
    Issue number2
    Early online date24 Oct 2018
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 15 Jan 2019

    Fingerprint

    C3 plants
    vascular plants
    Blood Vessels
    assimilation (physiology)
    Nitrogen
    carbon dioxide
    nitrogen
    Growth
    Triticum
    Ammonium Compounds
    Arabidopsis
    Carbon Dioxide
    Nitrates
    nutrition
    weight-of-evidence
    wheat
    Weights and Measures
    beans
    nitrates

    Keywords

    • Ammonium
    • carbon dioxide
    • N2 fixation
    • nitrate
    • photo-reduction of nitrate
    • urea

    Cite this

    Andrews, M., Condron, L. M., Kemp, P. D., Topping, J. F., Lindsey, K., Hodge, S., & Raven, J. A. (2019). Elevated CO2 effects on nitrogen assimilation and growth of C3 vascular plants are similar regardless of N-form assimilated. Journal of Experimental Botany, 70(2), 683-690. [ery371]. https://doi.org/10.1093/jxb/ery371
    Andrews, Mitchell ; Condron, Leo M. ; Kemp, Peter D. ; Topping, Jennifer F. ; Lindsey, Keith ; Hodge, Simon ; Raven, John A. / Elevated CO2 effects on nitrogen assimilation and growth of C3 vascular plants are similar regardless of N-form assimilated. In: Journal of Experimental Botany. 2019 ; Vol. 70, No. 2. pp. 683-690.
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    abstract = "Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) increased from around 280 ppm in 1750 to 400 ppm in 2016 and is likely to continue to increase throughout this century. It has been argued that wheat, Arabidopsis, and C3 plants in general respond more positively to elevated atmospheric [CO2] under ammonium (NH4+) nutrition than under nitrate (NO3-) nutrition because elevated CO2 inhibits their photoreduction of NO3- and hence reduces their total plant nitrogen (N) assimilation and ultimately growth. Here, it is argued that the weight of evidence in the literature indicates that elevated atmospheric [CO2] does not inhibit NO3- assimilation and growth of C3 vascular plants. New data for common bean and wheat support this view and indicate that the effects of elevated atmospheric [CO2] on N assimilation and growth of C3 vascular plants will be similar regardless of the form of N assimilated.",
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    Andrews, M, Condron, LM, Kemp, PD, Topping, JF, Lindsey, K, Hodge, S & Raven, JA 2019, 'Elevated CO2 effects on nitrogen assimilation and growth of C3 vascular plants are similar regardless of N-form assimilated', Journal of Experimental Botany, vol. 70, no. 2, ery371, pp. 683-690. https://doi.org/10.1093/jxb/ery371

    Elevated CO2 effects on nitrogen assimilation and growth of C3 vascular plants are similar regardless of N-form assimilated. / Andrews, Mitchell; Condron, Leo M.; Kemp, Peter D.; Topping, Jennifer F.; Lindsey, Keith; Hodge, Simon; Raven, John A.

    In: Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol. 70, No. 2, ery371, 15.01.2019, p. 683-690.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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