Empowerment of nursing students in the United Kingdom and Japan

a cross cultural study

Caroline Bradbury-Jones, Fiona Irvine, Sally Sambrook

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    18 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Aim. This paper is a report of a study to explore the phenomenon of empowerment cross-culturally by comparing the situations in which nursing students from the United Kingdom and Japan experienced empowerment and disempowerment in clinical practice. Background. Empowerment has been the focus of many studies, but most focus on the experience of Registered Nurses and few have explored the phenomenon crossculturally. Method. This was a cross-cultural, comparative study using the critical incident technique. Anonymous written data were collected from nursing students in Japan and United Kingdom between November 2005 and January 2006. Japanese data were translated and back-translated. Analysis of the transcripts revealed three themes: Learning in Practice, Team Membership, Power. Findings. Nursing students in these countries are exposed to different educational and clinical environments, but their experiences of empowerment and disempowerment are similar. For both, learning in practice, team membership and power are associated with either empowerment or disempowerment; depending on the context. United Kingdom students are aware of the importance of acting as patient advocates, although they cannot always find the voice to perform this. Japanese students however, appear to be unaware of the concept of advocacy. Conclusion. Student nurse empowerment may transcend cultural differences, and learning in practice, team membership and power may be important for the empowerment of nursing students globally. Further cross-cultural exploration is required into the association between advocacy and empowerment.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)379-387
    Number of pages9
    JournalJournal of Advanced Nursing
    Volume59
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Aug 2007

    Fingerprint

    Nursing Students
    Japan
    Learning
    Students
    United Kingdom
    Power (Psychology)
    Nurses
    Task Performance and Analysis

    Keywords

    • Clinical placements
    • Cross-cultural research
    • Empirical research report
    • Empowerment
    • Japan
    • Nurse education
    • Nursing students
    • United Kingdom

    Cite this

    Bradbury-Jones, Caroline ; Irvine, Fiona ; Sambrook, Sally. / Empowerment of nursing students in the United Kingdom and Japan : a cross cultural study. In: Journal of Advanced Nursing. 2007 ; Vol. 59, No. 4. pp. 379-387.
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    Empowerment of nursing students in the United Kingdom and Japan : a cross cultural study. / Bradbury-Jones, Caroline; Irvine, Fiona; Sambrook, Sally.

    In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, Vol. 59, No. 4, 08.2007, p. 379-387.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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