Engaging with families in child protection

lessons from practitioner research in Scotland

Michael Gallagher, Mark Smith, Heather Wilkinson, Viviene E. Cree, Helen Wosu, J. Stewart, Scott Hunter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)
46 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This paper reports findings from practitioner-led research on engagement with families in the child protection system in Scotland. Engagement is here defined in a participative sense, to mean the involvement of family members in shaping social work processes. Key findings include the importance of workers building trusting relationships; the value of honest and clear communication, information, and explanation; and the potential for formal structures such as reports and meetings to hinder family engagement. These findings contribute to a growing critique of managerialism in social work.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)117-134
Number of pages18
JournalChild Welfare
Volume90
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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Gallagher, M., Smith, M., Wilkinson, H., Cree, V. E., Wosu, H., Stewart, J., & Hunter, S. (2011). Engaging with families in child protection: lessons from practitioner research in Scotland. Child Welfare, 90(4), 117-134.
Gallagher, Michael ; Smith, Mark ; Wilkinson, Heather ; Cree, Viviene E. ; Wosu, Helen ; Stewart, J. ; Hunter, Scott. / Engaging with families in child protection : lessons from practitioner research in Scotland. In: Child Welfare. 2011 ; Vol. 90, No. 4. pp. 117-134.
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Gallagher, M, Smith, M, Wilkinson, H, Cree, VE, Wosu, H, Stewart, J & Hunter, S 2011, 'Engaging with families in child protection: lessons from practitioner research in Scotland', Child Welfare, vol. 90, no. 4, pp. 117-134.

Engaging with families in child protection : lessons from practitioner research in Scotland. / Gallagher, Michael; Smith, Mark; Wilkinson, Heather; Cree, Viviene E.; Wosu, Helen; Stewart, J.; Hunter, Scott.

In: Child Welfare, Vol. 90, No. 4, 2011, p. 117-134.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Wilkinson, Heather

AU - Cree, Viviene E.

AU - Wosu, Helen

AU - Stewart, J.

AU - Hunter, Scott

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Gallagher M, Smith M, Wilkinson H, Cree VE, Wosu H, Stewart J et al. Engaging with families in child protection: lessons from practitioner research in Scotland. Child Welfare. 2011;90(4):117-134.