Epicardial Adipose Tissue Is Related to Arterial Stiffness and Inflammation in Patients with Cardiovascular Disease and Type 2 Diabetes

Shaween Al-Talabany, Ify Mordi (Lead / Corresponding author), J. Graeme Houston, Helen M. Colhoun, Jonathan R. Weir-McCall, Shona Z. Matthew, Helen C. Looker, Daniel Levin, Jill J. F. Belch, Fiona Dove, Faisel Khan, Chim C. Lang

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Abstract

Background: Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) is an emerging cardio-metabolic risk factor and has been shown to correlate with adverse cardiovascular (CV) outcome; however the underlying pathophysiology of this link is not well understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between EAT and a comprehensive panel of cardiovascular risk biomarkers and pulse wave velocity (PWV) and indexed left ventricular mass (LVMI) in a cohort of patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes compared to controls.

Methods: 145 participants (mean age 63.9 ± 8.1 years; 61% male) were evaluated. All patients underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) examination and PWV. EAT measurements from CMR were performed on the 4-chamber view. Blood samples were taken and a range of CV biomarkers was evaluated.

Results: EAT measurements were significantly higher in the groups with CVD, with or without T2DM compared to patients without CVD or T2DM (group 1 EAT 15.9 ± 5.5 cm² vs. group 4 EAT 11.8 ± 4.1 cm2, p=0.001; group 3 EAT 15.1 ± 4.3cm² vs. group 4 EAT 11.8 ± 4.1 cm2, p=0.024). EAT was independently associated with IL-6 (beta 0.2, p=0.019). When added to clinical variables, both EAT (beta 0.16, p=0.035) and IL-6 (beta 0.26, p=0.003) were independently associated with PWV. EAT was significantly associated with LVMI in a univariable analysis but not when added to significant clinical variables.

Conclusions: In patients with cardio-metabolic disease, EAT was independently associated with PWV. EAT may be associated with CVD risk due to an increase in systemic vascular inflammation. Whether targeting EAT may reduce inflammation and/or cardiovascular risk should be evaluated in prospective studies.
Original languageEnglish
Article number31
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalBMC Cardiovascular Disorders
Volume18
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Feb 2018

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Arteritis
Vascular Stiffness
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Adipose Tissue
Cardiovascular Diseases
Pulse Wave Analysis
Interleukin-6
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Biomarkers
Inflammation
Metabolic Diseases
Blood Vessels

Keywords

  • Epicardial adipose tissue
  • pulse wave velocity
  • artifical stiffness
  • cardiovascular magnetic resonance
  • left ventricular mass
  • Type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • Arterial stiffness
  • Cardiovascular magnetic resonance
  • Pulse wave velocity
  • Left ventricular mass
  • Pulse Wave Analysis
  • Humans
  • Middle Aged
  • Adipose Tissue/diagnostic imaging
  • Male
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/diagnosis
  • Case-Control Studies
  • Scotland/epidemiology
  • Adiposity
  • Female
  • Vascular Stiffness
  • Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis
  • Risk Factors
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Cine
  • Inflammation/diagnosis
  • Pericardium
  • Aged

Cite this

@article{8ac2340940a248c4a9aeaf546e860463,
title = "Epicardial Adipose Tissue Is Related to Arterial Stiffness and Inflammation in Patients with Cardiovascular Disease and Type 2 Diabetes",
abstract = "Background: Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) is an emerging cardio-metabolic risk factor and has been shown to correlate with adverse cardiovascular (CV) outcome; however the underlying pathophysiology of this link is not well understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between EAT and a comprehensive panel of cardiovascular risk biomarkers and pulse wave velocity (PWV) and indexed left ventricular mass (LVMI) in a cohort of patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes compared to controls.Methods: 145 participants (mean age 63.9 ± 8.1 years; 61{\%} male) were evaluated. All patients underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) examination and PWV. EAT measurements from CMR were performed on the 4-chamber view. Blood samples were taken and a range of CV biomarkers was evaluated.Results: EAT measurements were significantly higher in the groups with CVD, with or without T2DM compared to patients without CVD or T2DM (group 1 EAT 15.9 ± 5.5 cm² vs. group 4 EAT 11.8 ± 4.1 cm2, p=0.001; group 3 EAT 15.1 ± 4.3cm² vs. group 4 EAT 11.8 ± 4.1 cm2, p=0.024). EAT was independently associated with IL-6 (beta 0.2, p=0.019). When added to clinical variables, both EAT (beta 0.16, p=0.035) and IL-6 (beta 0.26, p=0.003) were independently associated with PWV. EAT was significantly associated with LVMI in a univariable analysis but not when added to significant clinical variables.Conclusions: In patients with cardio-metabolic disease, EAT was independently associated with PWV. EAT may be associated with CVD risk due to an increase in systemic vascular inflammation. Whether targeting EAT may reduce inflammation and/or cardiovascular risk should be evaluated in prospective studies.",
keywords = "Epicardial adipose tissue, pulse wave velocity, artifical stiffness, cardiovascular magnetic resonance, left ventricular mass, Type 2 diabetes mellitus, Arterial stiffness, Cardiovascular magnetic resonance, Pulse wave velocity, Left ventricular mass, Pulse Wave Analysis, Humans, Middle Aged, Adipose Tissue/diagnostic imaging, Male, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/diagnosis, Case-Control Studies, Scotland/epidemiology, Adiposity, Female, Vascular Stiffness, Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis, Risk Factors, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Cine, Inflammation/diagnosis, Pericardium, Aged",
author = "Shaween Al-Talabany and Ify Mordi and Houston, {J. Graeme} and Colhoun, {Helen M.} and Weir-McCall, {Jonathan R.} and Matthew, {Shona Z.} and Looker, {Helen C.} and Daniel Levin and Belch, {Jill J. F.} and Fiona Dove and Faisel Khan and Lang, {Chim C.}",
note = "This is sub-study of the multicentre SUMMIT study. The research leading to these results has received support from the Innovative Medicines Initiative Joint Undertaking under Grant Agreement No. 115006, resources of which are composed of financial contribution from the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007–2013) and EFPIA companies in kind contribution. IM is supported by a NHS Education for Scotland/Chief Scientist Office Postdoctoral Clinical Lectureship (PCL 17/07). JRWM is supported by the Wellcome Trust through the Scottish Translational Medicine and Therapeutics Initiative (Grant No. WT 085664) in the form of a Clinical Research Fellowship. Neither groups had any role in: study design, the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data; in the writing of the manuscript; nor in the decision to submit the manuscript for publication.",
year = "2018",
month = "2",
day = "13",
doi = "10.1186/s12872-018-0770-z",
language = "English",
volume = "18",
pages = "1--8",
journal = "BMC Cardiovascular Disorders",
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Epicardial Adipose Tissue Is Related to Arterial Stiffness and Inflammation in Patients with Cardiovascular Disease and Type 2 Diabetes. / Al-Talabany, Shaween; Mordi, Ify (Lead / Corresponding author); Houston, J. Graeme; Colhoun, Helen M.; Weir-McCall, Jonathan R.; Matthew, Shona Z.; Looker, Helen C.; Levin, Daniel; Belch, Jill J. F.; Dove, Fiona; Khan, Faisel; Lang, Chim C.

In: BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, Vol. 18, 31, 13.02.2018, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Epicardial Adipose Tissue Is Related to Arterial Stiffness and Inflammation in Patients with Cardiovascular Disease and Type 2 Diabetes

AU - Al-Talabany, Shaween

AU - Mordi, Ify

AU - Houston, J. Graeme

AU - Colhoun, Helen M.

AU - Weir-McCall, Jonathan R.

AU - Matthew, Shona Z.

AU - Looker, Helen C.

AU - Levin, Daniel

AU - Belch, Jill J. F.

AU - Dove, Fiona

AU - Khan, Faisel

AU - Lang, Chim C.

N1 - This is sub-study of the multicentre SUMMIT study. The research leading to these results has received support from the Innovative Medicines Initiative Joint Undertaking under Grant Agreement No. 115006, resources of which are composed of financial contribution from the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007–2013) and EFPIA companies in kind contribution. IM is supported by a NHS Education for Scotland/Chief Scientist Office Postdoctoral Clinical Lectureship (PCL 17/07). JRWM is supported by the Wellcome Trust through the Scottish Translational Medicine and Therapeutics Initiative (Grant No. WT 085664) in the form of a Clinical Research Fellowship. Neither groups had any role in: study design, the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data; in the writing of the manuscript; nor in the decision to submit the manuscript for publication.

PY - 2018/2/13

Y1 - 2018/2/13

N2 - Background: Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) is an emerging cardio-metabolic risk factor and has been shown to correlate with adverse cardiovascular (CV) outcome; however the underlying pathophysiology of this link is not well understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between EAT and a comprehensive panel of cardiovascular risk biomarkers and pulse wave velocity (PWV) and indexed left ventricular mass (LVMI) in a cohort of patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes compared to controls.Methods: 145 participants (mean age 63.9 ± 8.1 years; 61% male) were evaluated. All patients underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) examination and PWV. EAT measurements from CMR were performed on the 4-chamber view. Blood samples were taken and a range of CV biomarkers was evaluated.Results: EAT measurements were significantly higher in the groups with CVD, with or without T2DM compared to patients without CVD or T2DM (group 1 EAT 15.9 ± 5.5 cm² vs. group 4 EAT 11.8 ± 4.1 cm2, p=0.001; group 3 EAT 15.1 ± 4.3cm² vs. group 4 EAT 11.8 ± 4.1 cm2, p=0.024). EAT was independently associated with IL-6 (beta 0.2, p=0.019). When added to clinical variables, both EAT (beta 0.16, p=0.035) and IL-6 (beta 0.26, p=0.003) were independently associated with PWV. EAT was significantly associated with LVMI in a univariable analysis but not when added to significant clinical variables.Conclusions: In patients with cardio-metabolic disease, EAT was independently associated with PWV. EAT may be associated with CVD risk due to an increase in systemic vascular inflammation. Whether targeting EAT may reduce inflammation and/or cardiovascular risk should be evaluated in prospective studies.

AB - Background: Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) is an emerging cardio-metabolic risk factor and has been shown to correlate with adverse cardiovascular (CV) outcome; however the underlying pathophysiology of this link is not well understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between EAT and a comprehensive panel of cardiovascular risk biomarkers and pulse wave velocity (PWV) and indexed left ventricular mass (LVMI) in a cohort of patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes compared to controls.Methods: 145 participants (mean age 63.9 ± 8.1 years; 61% male) were evaluated. All patients underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) examination and PWV. EAT measurements from CMR were performed on the 4-chamber view. Blood samples were taken and a range of CV biomarkers was evaluated.Results: EAT measurements were significantly higher in the groups with CVD, with or without T2DM compared to patients without CVD or T2DM (group 1 EAT 15.9 ± 5.5 cm² vs. group 4 EAT 11.8 ± 4.1 cm2, p=0.001; group 3 EAT 15.1 ± 4.3cm² vs. group 4 EAT 11.8 ± 4.1 cm2, p=0.024). EAT was independently associated with IL-6 (beta 0.2, p=0.019). When added to clinical variables, both EAT (beta 0.16, p=0.035) and IL-6 (beta 0.26, p=0.003) were independently associated with PWV. EAT was significantly associated with LVMI in a univariable analysis but not when added to significant clinical variables.Conclusions: In patients with cardio-metabolic disease, EAT was independently associated with PWV. EAT may be associated with CVD risk due to an increase in systemic vascular inflammation. Whether targeting EAT may reduce inflammation and/or cardiovascular risk should be evaluated in prospective studies.

KW - Epicardial adipose tissue

KW - pulse wave velocity

KW - artifical stiffness

KW - cardiovascular magnetic resonance

KW - left ventricular mass

KW - Type 2 diabetes mellitus

KW - Arterial stiffness

KW - Cardiovascular magnetic resonance

KW - Pulse wave velocity

KW - Left ventricular mass

KW - Pulse Wave Analysis

KW - Humans

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Adipose Tissue/diagnostic imaging

KW - Male

KW - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/diagnosis

KW - Case-Control Studies

KW - Scotland/epidemiology

KW - Adiposity

KW - Female

KW - Vascular Stiffness

KW - Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis

KW - Risk Factors

KW - Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Cine

KW - Inflammation/diagnosis

KW - Pericardium

KW - Aged

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U2 - 10.1186/s12872-018-0770-z

DO - 10.1186/s12872-018-0770-z

M3 - Article

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JO - BMC Cardiovascular Disorders

JF - BMC Cardiovascular Disorders

SN - 1471-2261

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