Epidemiology of primary hyperparathyroidism in Tayside, Scotland, UK

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    87 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objective
    To evaluate prevalence and incidence of diagnosed primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) in adults between 1997 and 2006 in Tayside, Scotland, UK.
    Design
    Population-based incidence and prevalence study.
    Patients
    All Tayside residents aged 20 years and over with an increased serum calcium level (> 2 center dot 55 mmol/l) between 1997 and 2006 were included as potential participants. Using a unique patient identifier, data-linkage enabled a data set of PHPT patients to be created from an algorithm of biochemistry records, nuclear scan records, histology records, hospital clinic letters and community based prescription records. Persons having tertiary hyperparathyroidism (14 center dot 0%) were also identified and were excluded.

    Outcome measures

    Age and sex adjusted incidence density and period prevalence were calculated for each year.

    Results

    We identified 2709 patients (70 center dot 8% female) diagnosed with PHPT by the end of 2006. The mean age of women (68 years SD = 14) was older than that of men (64 years SD = 15) at baseline. The prevalence of diagnosed PHPT in Tayside increased from 1 center dot 82 per 1000 population in 1997 to 6 center dot 72 per 1000 population in 2006 (P < 0 center dot 001). Prevalence of PHPT is higher in females, and the female preponderance increases with age; the annual prevalence ratio between women and men is stable at around 2 center dot 5 each year. There was a 3-4-year cyclical incidence rate varying from 4 center dot 13 to 11 center dot 30 per 10 000 person-years.

    Conclusion

    We observed a general increase in the prevalence of diagnosed PHPT in Tayside, Scotland. The incidence of diagnosis is greater in females than in males and increases with age. The annual incidence followed an apparent cyclic curve during the study period.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)485-493
    Number of pages9
    JournalClinical Endocrinology
    Volume71
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Oct 2009

    Keywords

    • Asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism
    • Thyroid epidemiology
    • Population
    • Management
    • Audit
    • Perspective
    • Dysfunction
    • Statement
    • Diagnosis
    • Workshop

    Cite this

    @article{49ef1e6afa754467b711f36e3054e7a5,
    title = "Epidemiology of primary hyperparathyroidism in Tayside, Scotland, UK",
    abstract = "Objective To evaluate prevalence and incidence of diagnosed primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) in adults between 1997 and 2006 in Tayside, Scotland, UK. Design Population-based incidence and prevalence study. Patients All Tayside residents aged 20 years and over with an increased serum calcium level (> 2 center dot 55 mmol/l) between 1997 and 2006 were included as potential participants. Using a unique patient identifier, data-linkage enabled a data set of PHPT patients to be created from an algorithm of biochemistry records, nuclear scan records, histology records, hospital clinic letters and community based prescription records. Persons having tertiary hyperparathyroidism (14 center dot 0{\%}) were also identified and were excluded. Outcome measures Age and sex adjusted incidence density and period prevalence were calculated for each year. Results We identified 2709 patients (70 center dot 8{\%} female) diagnosed with PHPT by the end of 2006. The mean age of women (68 years SD = 14) was older than that of men (64 years SD = 15) at baseline. The prevalence of diagnosed PHPT in Tayside increased from 1 center dot 82 per 1000 population in 1997 to 6 center dot 72 per 1000 population in 2006 (P < 0 center dot 001). Prevalence of PHPT is higher in females, and the female preponderance increases with age; the annual prevalence ratio between women and men is stable at around 2 center dot 5 each year. There was a 3-4-year cyclical incidence rate varying from 4 center dot 13 to 11 center dot 30 per 10 000 person-years. Conclusion We observed a general increase in the prevalence of diagnosed PHPT in Tayside, Scotland. The incidence of diagnosis is greater in females than in males and increases with age. The annual incidence followed an apparent cyclic curve during the study period.",
    keywords = "Asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism , Thyroid epidemiology, Population, Management, Audit, Perspective, Dysfunction, Statement, Diagnosis, Workshop",
    author = "Ning Yu and Donnan, {Peter T.} and Murphy, {Michael J.} and Leese, {Graham P.}",
    year = "2009",
    month = "10",
    doi = "10.1111/j.1365-2265.2008.03520.x",
    language = "English",
    volume = "71",
    pages = "485--493",
    journal = "Clinical Endocrinology",
    issn = "0300-0664",
    publisher = "Wiley",
    number = "4",

    }

    Epidemiology of primary hyperparathyroidism in Tayside, Scotland, UK. / Yu, Ning; Donnan, Peter T.; Murphy, Michael J.; Leese, Graham P.

    In: Clinical Endocrinology, Vol. 71, No. 4, 10.2009, p. 485-493.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Epidemiology of primary hyperparathyroidism in Tayside, Scotland, UK

    AU - Yu, Ning

    AU - Donnan, Peter T.

    AU - Murphy, Michael J.

    AU - Leese, Graham P.

    PY - 2009/10

    Y1 - 2009/10

    N2 - Objective To evaluate prevalence and incidence of diagnosed primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) in adults between 1997 and 2006 in Tayside, Scotland, UK. Design Population-based incidence and prevalence study. Patients All Tayside residents aged 20 years and over with an increased serum calcium level (> 2 center dot 55 mmol/l) between 1997 and 2006 were included as potential participants. Using a unique patient identifier, data-linkage enabled a data set of PHPT patients to be created from an algorithm of biochemistry records, nuclear scan records, histology records, hospital clinic letters and community based prescription records. Persons having tertiary hyperparathyroidism (14 center dot 0%) were also identified and were excluded. Outcome measures Age and sex adjusted incidence density and period prevalence were calculated for each year. Results We identified 2709 patients (70 center dot 8% female) diagnosed with PHPT by the end of 2006. The mean age of women (68 years SD = 14) was older than that of men (64 years SD = 15) at baseline. The prevalence of diagnosed PHPT in Tayside increased from 1 center dot 82 per 1000 population in 1997 to 6 center dot 72 per 1000 population in 2006 (P < 0 center dot 001). Prevalence of PHPT is higher in females, and the female preponderance increases with age; the annual prevalence ratio between women and men is stable at around 2 center dot 5 each year. There was a 3-4-year cyclical incidence rate varying from 4 center dot 13 to 11 center dot 30 per 10 000 person-years. Conclusion We observed a general increase in the prevalence of diagnosed PHPT in Tayside, Scotland. The incidence of diagnosis is greater in females than in males and increases with age. The annual incidence followed an apparent cyclic curve during the study period.

    AB - Objective To evaluate prevalence and incidence of diagnosed primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) in adults between 1997 and 2006 in Tayside, Scotland, UK. Design Population-based incidence and prevalence study. Patients All Tayside residents aged 20 years and over with an increased serum calcium level (> 2 center dot 55 mmol/l) between 1997 and 2006 were included as potential participants. Using a unique patient identifier, data-linkage enabled a data set of PHPT patients to be created from an algorithm of biochemistry records, nuclear scan records, histology records, hospital clinic letters and community based prescription records. Persons having tertiary hyperparathyroidism (14 center dot 0%) were also identified and were excluded. Outcome measures Age and sex adjusted incidence density and period prevalence were calculated for each year. Results We identified 2709 patients (70 center dot 8% female) diagnosed with PHPT by the end of 2006. The mean age of women (68 years SD = 14) was older than that of men (64 years SD = 15) at baseline. The prevalence of diagnosed PHPT in Tayside increased from 1 center dot 82 per 1000 population in 1997 to 6 center dot 72 per 1000 population in 2006 (P < 0 center dot 001). Prevalence of PHPT is higher in females, and the female preponderance increases with age; the annual prevalence ratio between women and men is stable at around 2 center dot 5 each year. There was a 3-4-year cyclical incidence rate varying from 4 center dot 13 to 11 center dot 30 per 10 000 person-years. Conclusion We observed a general increase in the prevalence of diagnosed PHPT in Tayside, Scotland. The incidence of diagnosis is greater in females than in males and increases with age. The annual incidence followed an apparent cyclic curve during the study period.

    KW - Asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism

    KW - Thyroid epidemiology

    KW - Population

    KW - Management

    KW - Audit

    KW - Perspective

    KW - Dysfunction

    KW - Statement

    KW - Diagnosis

    KW - Workshop

    U2 - 10.1111/j.1365-2265.2008.03520.x

    DO - 10.1111/j.1365-2265.2008.03520.x

    M3 - Article

    VL - 71

    SP - 485

    EP - 493

    JO - Clinical Endocrinology

    JF - Clinical Endocrinology

    SN - 0300-0664

    IS - 4

    ER -