Epigenetic risks related to assisted reproductive technologies

epigenetics, imprinting, ART and icebergs?

Eamonn R. Maher, Masoud Afnan, Christopher L Barratt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

193 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recently, a series of case reports and small studies has suggested that births involving assisted reproductive technology (ART) may have an increased risk of imprinting disorders such as Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and Angelman syndrome. Herein, the significance and implications of these findings are discussed. It is speculated that, although such imprinting disorders may be shown to be only rare complications of ART, epigenetic errors might account for a much wider spectrum of ART-related complications than is recognized currently. Addressing these questions should be a priority for research on cohorts of ART children.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2508-2511
Number of pages4
JournalHuman Reproduction
Volume18
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2003

Fingerprint

Ice Cover
Assisted Reproductive Techniques
Epigenomics
Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome
Angelman Syndrome
Parturition
Research

Keywords

  • Angelman Syndrome/epidemiology
  • Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome/epidemiology
  • Epigenesis, Genetic
  • Female
  • Genetic Diseases, Inborn/epidemiology
  • Genomic Imprinting
  • Humans
  • Pregnancy
  • Reproductive Techniques, Assisted/adverse effects
  • Risk Factors

Cite this

@article{2eff4171e61b49088d28761ec5a69e7b,
title = "Epigenetic risks related to assisted reproductive technologies: epigenetics, imprinting, ART and icebergs?",
abstract = "Recently, a series of case reports and small studies has suggested that births involving assisted reproductive technology (ART) may have an increased risk of imprinting disorders such as Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and Angelman syndrome. Herein, the significance and implications of these findings are discussed. It is speculated that, although such imprinting disorders may be shown to be only rare complications of ART, epigenetic errors might account for a much wider spectrum of ART-related complications than is recognized currently. Addressing these questions should be a priority for research on cohorts of ART children.",
keywords = "Angelman Syndrome/epidemiology, Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome/epidemiology, Epigenesis, Genetic, Female, Genetic Diseases, Inborn/epidemiology, Genomic Imprinting, Humans, Pregnancy, Reproductive Techniques, Assisted/adverse effects, Risk Factors",
author = "Maher, {Eamonn R.} and Masoud Afnan and Barratt, {Christopher L}",
year = "2003",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1093/humrep/deg486",
language = "English",
volume = "18",
pages = "2508--2511",
journal = "Human Reproduction",
issn = "0268-1161",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "12",

}

Epigenetic risks related to assisted reproductive technologies : epigenetics, imprinting, ART and icebergs? / Maher, Eamonn R.; Afnan, Masoud; Barratt, Christopher L.

In: Human Reproduction, Vol. 18, No. 12, 12.2003, p. 2508-2511.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Epigenetic risks related to assisted reproductive technologies

T2 - epigenetics, imprinting, ART and icebergs?

AU - Maher, Eamonn R.

AU - Afnan, Masoud

AU - Barratt, Christopher L

PY - 2003/12

Y1 - 2003/12

N2 - Recently, a series of case reports and small studies has suggested that births involving assisted reproductive technology (ART) may have an increased risk of imprinting disorders such as Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and Angelman syndrome. Herein, the significance and implications of these findings are discussed. It is speculated that, although such imprinting disorders may be shown to be only rare complications of ART, epigenetic errors might account for a much wider spectrum of ART-related complications than is recognized currently. Addressing these questions should be a priority for research on cohorts of ART children.

AB - Recently, a series of case reports and small studies has suggested that births involving assisted reproductive technology (ART) may have an increased risk of imprinting disorders such as Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and Angelman syndrome. Herein, the significance and implications of these findings are discussed. It is speculated that, although such imprinting disorders may be shown to be only rare complications of ART, epigenetic errors might account for a much wider spectrum of ART-related complications than is recognized currently. Addressing these questions should be a priority for research on cohorts of ART children.

KW - Angelman Syndrome/epidemiology

KW - Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome/epidemiology

KW - Epigenesis, Genetic

KW - Female

KW - Genetic Diseases, Inborn/epidemiology

KW - Genomic Imprinting

KW - Humans

KW - Pregnancy

KW - Reproductive Techniques, Assisted/adverse effects

KW - Risk Factors

U2 - 10.1093/humrep/deg486

DO - 10.1093/humrep/deg486

M3 - Article

VL - 18

SP - 2508

EP - 2511

JO - Human Reproduction

JF - Human Reproduction

SN - 0268-1161

IS - 12

ER -