Exercise training as a therapy for chronic heart failure: can older people benefit?

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    38 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Despite recent advances in pharmacological therapy, chronic heart failure remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in older people. Studies of exercise training in younger, carefully selected patients with heart failure have shown improvements in symptoms and exercise capacity and in many pathophysiological aspects of heart failure, including skeletal myopathy, ergoreceptor function, heart rate variability, endothelial function, and cytokine expression. Data on mortality and hospitalization are lacking, and effects on everyday activity, depression, and quality of life are unclear. Exercise therapy for patients with heart failure appears to be safe and has the potential to improve function and quality of life in older people with heart failure. To realize these potential benefits, exercise programs that are suitable for older, frail people need to be established and tested in an older, frail, unselected population with comorbidities.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)699-709
    Number of pages11
    JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
    Volume51
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - May 2003

    Fingerprint

    Heart Failure
    Exercise
    Quality of Life
    Therapeutics
    Exercise Therapy
    Mortality
    Muscular Diseases
    Comorbidity
    Hospitalization
    Heart Rate
    Pharmacology
    Cytokines
    Morbidity
    Population

    Keywords

    • Heart failure
    • Exercise training
    • Physical training
    • Older people

    Cite this

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    title = "Exercise training as a therapy for chronic heart failure: can older people benefit?",
    abstract = "Despite recent advances in pharmacological therapy, chronic heart failure remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in older people. Studies of exercise training in younger, carefully selected patients with heart failure have shown improvements in symptoms and exercise capacity and in many pathophysiological aspects of heart failure, including skeletal myopathy, ergoreceptor function, heart rate variability, endothelial function, and cytokine expression. Data on mortality and hospitalization are lacking, and effects on everyday activity, depression, and quality of life are unclear. Exercise therapy for patients with heart failure appears to be safe and has the potential to improve function and quality of life in older people with heart failure. To realize these potential benefits, exercise programs that are suitable for older, frail people need to be established and tested in an older, frail, unselected population with comorbidities.",
    keywords = "Heart failure, Exercise training, Physical training, Older people",
    author = "Witham, {Miles D.} and Struthers, {Allan D.} and McMurdo, {Marion E. T.}",
    year = "2003",
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    language = "English",
    volume = "51",
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    T1 - Exercise training as a therapy for chronic heart failure

    T2 - can older people benefit?

    AU - Witham, Miles D.

    AU - Struthers, Allan D.

    AU - McMurdo, Marion E. T.

    PY - 2003/5

    Y1 - 2003/5

    N2 - Despite recent advances in pharmacological therapy, chronic heart failure remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in older people. Studies of exercise training in younger, carefully selected patients with heart failure have shown improvements in symptoms and exercise capacity and in many pathophysiological aspects of heart failure, including skeletal myopathy, ergoreceptor function, heart rate variability, endothelial function, and cytokine expression. Data on mortality and hospitalization are lacking, and effects on everyday activity, depression, and quality of life are unclear. Exercise therapy for patients with heart failure appears to be safe and has the potential to improve function and quality of life in older people with heart failure. To realize these potential benefits, exercise programs that are suitable for older, frail people need to be established and tested in an older, frail, unselected population with comorbidities.

    AB - Despite recent advances in pharmacological therapy, chronic heart failure remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in older people. Studies of exercise training in younger, carefully selected patients with heart failure have shown improvements in symptoms and exercise capacity and in many pathophysiological aspects of heart failure, including skeletal myopathy, ergoreceptor function, heart rate variability, endothelial function, and cytokine expression. Data on mortality and hospitalization are lacking, and effects on everyday activity, depression, and quality of life are unclear. Exercise therapy for patients with heart failure appears to be safe and has the potential to improve function and quality of life in older people with heart failure. To realize these potential benefits, exercise programs that are suitable for older, frail people need to be established and tested in an older, frail, unselected population with comorbidities.

    KW - Heart failure

    KW - Exercise training

    KW - Physical training

    KW - Older people

    U2 - 10.1034/j.1600-0579.2003.00217.x

    DO - 10.1034/j.1600-0579.2003.00217.x

    M3 - Review article

    C2 - 12752848

    VL - 51

    SP - 699

    EP - 709

    JO - Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

    JF - Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

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