Exploring Animation and Virtual Reality to Represent the Perceptual-Experiences of Art-Practitioners with Sight-Loss

Andrea McSwan (Lead / Corresponding author)

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Whilst the sighted generally imagine people with blindness as living in darkness, only a small percentage of people have total vision loss and many visually impaired persons have some perception of light, form, movement, and shape. As mental images can be generated without sight, the ability to see is not necessary for the creation of visual art. This practice-based PhD project explores animation and virtual reality to represent the creative practice of artists with sight-loss. Using virtual worlds to enable sighted users to understand another person’s perceptual-experiences, this inductive research adopts an interpretive approach incorporating the strength of case-study to compare abstract concepts of blindness to actual lived experiences. The methodology will apply qualitative techniques, to understand the methods artists with sight-loss use and how visual impairment shapes their practice. Responses will be evaluated, by analysing the data to create an immersive animation, viewed, and experienced in virtual reality.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)315-324
    Number of pages10
    JournalDesign Journal
    Volume24
    Issue number2
    Early online date3 Feb 2021
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2021

    Keywords

    • animation
    • blindness
    • perceptual representation
    • sensory
    • virtual reality
    • visual impairment

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