Exploring multiple factors affecting participation outcomes for children with communication aids

Tom Griffiths, Michael Clarke, K.V. Petrides, C. Newton, Katie Price, Andrew Lysley

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

21 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Supporting and developing participation in everyday life is an ultimate goal of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) intervention. Participation is defined by the World Health Organisation as “a person’s involvement in a life situation” (WHO, 2001 p.213), where ‘involvement’ is characterised as “…taking part, being included or engaged in a life area, being accepted…” (WHO, 2001 p.15). While in many cases the provision of communication aids can significantly promote children’s participation in everyday life, some children apparently do not benefit fully from communication aids.

It has long been acknowledged that multiple and various factors can influence the take-up and use of communication aids and the impact of communication aids on children’s participation in everyday activities. Research in the AAC field has identified many of these factors. Arguably however, the ways in which such factors interact to influence the impact of communication aids on children’s participation is apparently less well understood.

This brief paper provides an outline of pilot research being undertaken to establish a reliable parent-response questionnaire aimed at exploring how environmental, personal and child factors interact to affect children’s communication aid use and participation. Some preliminary findings concerning children’s profiles of participation are also presented.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)29-31
Number of pages3
JournalCommunication Matters Journal
Volume24
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2010
EventCommunication Matters: National Conference 2009 - University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom
Duration: 20 Sept 200922 Sept 2009

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Exploring multiple factors affecting participation outcomes for children with communication aids'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this