Exploring wellbeing and remote learning using the Delphi method: engaging teacher education students as co-producers of practice

Wendee White (Lead / Corresponding author), Paola Sangster

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    Abstract

    In UK Higher Education (HE), there is a growing awareness that well-being is central to student experience. Increasingly, HE agendas are promoting a targeted holistic institutional approach to wellbeing that supports students thrive in and beyond the student journey. This study explores teacher education students’ experiences as the product of the synergistic effects of wellbeing and eco-systemic factors related to remote learning. In turn, findings feed into programme and practice developments that support positive wellbeing. A Conventional Delphi Method was used for its effectiveness addressing four different conditions: 1) accessing geographically dispersed populations; 2) overcoming unequal power dynamics; 3) supporting structured communication between experts on a topic leading to consensus building and decision making; 4) engaging students as co-producers of practice to support positive wellbeing. Our findings provide new insight into the internal and external to study factors that interact with student wellbeing to benefit, challenge, or threaten student experience and the coping resources teacher education students rely on to maintain their education trajectories. These insights provide valuable understanding informing future teacher education programming and practice.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)7-32
    Number of pages26
    JournalJournal of Teacher Education and Educators
    Volume11
    Issue number1
    Publication statusPublished - 30 Apr 2022

    Keywords

    • Student experience
    • Delphi Method
    • Wellbeing
    • Remote Learning
    • Teacher education

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