Facial reconstruction -

anatomical art or artistic anatomy?

Caroline Wilkinson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    76 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Facial reconstruction is employed in the context of forensic investigation and for creating three-dimensional portraits of people from the past, from ancient Egyptian mummies and bog bodies to digital animations of J. S. Bach. This paper considers a facial reconstruction method (commonly known as the Manchester method) associated with the depiction and identification of the deceased from skeletal remains. Issues of artistic licence and scientific rigour, in relation to soft tissue reconstruction, anatomical variation and skeletal assessment, are discussed. The need for artistic interpretation is greatest where only skeletal material is available, particularly for the morphology of the ears and mouth, and with the skin for an ageing adult. The greatest accuracy is possible when information is available from preserved soft tissue, from a portrait, or from a pathological condition or healed injury.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)235-250
    Number of pages16
    JournalJournal of Anatomy
    Volume216
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Feb 2010

    Keywords

    • anatomy
    • art
    • facial reconstruction
    • TISSUE DEPTH MEASUREMENTS
    • ZYGOMATICUS MAJOR MUSCLE
    • AGE-RELATED-CHANGES
    • FACE RECOGNITION
    • PROFILE CHANGES
    • COMPUTERIZED-TOMOGRAPHY
    • EXTERNAL NOSE
    • IDENTIFICATION
    • THICKNESS
    • SKULL

    Cite this

    Wilkinson, Caroline. / Facial reconstruction - : anatomical art or artistic anatomy?. In: Journal of Anatomy. 2010 ; Vol. 216, No. 2. pp. 235-250.
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    title = "Facial reconstruction -: anatomical art or artistic anatomy?",
    abstract = "Facial reconstruction is employed in the context of forensic investigation and for creating three-dimensional portraits of people from the past, from ancient Egyptian mummies and bog bodies to digital animations of J. S. Bach. This paper considers a facial reconstruction method (commonly known as the Manchester method) associated with the depiction and identification of the deceased from skeletal remains. Issues of artistic licence and scientific rigour, in relation to soft tissue reconstruction, anatomical variation and skeletal assessment, are discussed. The need for artistic interpretation is greatest where only skeletal material is available, particularly for the morphology of the ears and mouth, and with the skin for an ageing adult. The greatest accuracy is possible when information is available from preserved soft tissue, from a portrait, or from a pathological condition or healed injury.",
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    language = "English",
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    Facial reconstruction - : anatomical art or artistic anatomy? / Wilkinson, Caroline.

    In: Journal of Anatomy, Vol. 216, No. 2, 02.2010, p. 235-250.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    T2 - anatomical art or artistic anatomy?

    AU - Wilkinson, Caroline

    PY - 2010/2

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    N2 - Facial reconstruction is employed in the context of forensic investigation and for creating three-dimensional portraits of people from the past, from ancient Egyptian mummies and bog bodies to digital animations of J. S. Bach. This paper considers a facial reconstruction method (commonly known as the Manchester method) associated with the depiction and identification of the deceased from skeletal remains. Issues of artistic licence and scientific rigour, in relation to soft tissue reconstruction, anatomical variation and skeletal assessment, are discussed. The need for artistic interpretation is greatest where only skeletal material is available, particularly for the morphology of the ears and mouth, and with the skin for an ageing adult. The greatest accuracy is possible when information is available from preserved soft tissue, from a portrait, or from a pathological condition or healed injury.

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    KW - ZYGOMATICUS MAJOR MUSCLE

    KW - AGE-RELATED-CHANGES

    KW - FACE RECOGNITION

    KW - PROFILE CHANGES

    KW - COMPUTERIZED-TOMOGRAPHY

    KW - EXTERNAL NOSE

    KW - IDENTIFICATION

    KW - THICKNESS

    KW - SKULL

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