Foreign policy in transition: the ANC’s search for a foreign policy direction during South Africa’s transition, 1990-1994

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    Abstract

    At the beginning of the transition from apartheid to democracy, the African National Congress (ANC) was unprepared for foreign policy discussion, a lack of readiness magnified by the collapse of international Communism and the Cold War ideology. President De Klerk and the National Party controlled foreign policy in the early years of the transition and began the process of reintegration with the international community, The ANC initially struggled to adapt to the new international situation, whereas De Klerk was successful in wooing the international community. In the later stages of transition, the ANC developed a greater sense of direction and substance in foreign relations, although there were differences of opinion among and between the leadership and the rank and file. Already in 1994 there was evidence of tension between idealism and pragmatism. Post-apartheid foreign policy under Mandela was riddled with inconsistencies, which stemmed from the events of South Africa’s transition
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)405-423
    Number of pages19
    JournalThe Round Table: The Commonwealth Journal of International Affairs
    Volume101
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

    Keywords

    • South Africa
    • African National Congress
    • transition
    • Nelson Mandela
    • Cold War
    • National Party (NP)
    • F. W. De Klerk
    • Post-apartheid
    • Foreign policy

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