Fraping, social norms and online representations of self

Wendy Moncur (Lead / Corresponding author), Kathryn M. Orzech, Fergus G. Neville

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)
164 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This paper reports on qualitative insights generated from 46 semi-structured interviews with adults ranging in age from 18 to 70. It focuses on an online social behaviour, ‘fraping’, which involves the unauthorised alteration of content on a person’s social networking site (SNS) profile by a third party. Our exploratory research elucidates what constitutes a frape, who is involved in it, and what the social norms surrounding the activity are. We provide insights into how frape contributes to online sociality and the co-construction of online identity, and identify opportunities for further work in understanding the interplay between online social identities, social groups and social norms.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)125-131
Number of pages7
JournalComputers in Human Behavior
Volume63
Early online date20 May 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2016

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Social Networking
Social Identification
Social Behavior
Interviews
Research
Social Norms
Sociality
Alteration
Person
Co-construction
Social Identity
Social Groups

Keywords

  • Fraping
  • Social media
  • Social norms
  • Social identity
  • Teenagers
  • Young adults

Cite this

Moncur, Wendy ; Orzech, Kathryn M. ; Neville, Fergus G. / Fraping, social norms and online representations of self. In: Computers in Human Behavior. 2016 ; Vol. 63. pp. 125-131.
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Fraping, social norms and online representations of self. / Moncur, Wendy (Lead / Corresponding author); Orzech, Kathryn M.; Neville, Fergus G.

In: Computers in Human Behavior, Vol. 63, 10.2016, p. 125-131.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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