Gastric and colorectal cancers in Scotland

a study of the geographical distributions and selected associations

F. L. Williams, O. L. Lloyd

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The geographical distributions of gastric and colorectal cancers in Scotland were investigated by analysing the data available for those diseases in the Annual Reports of the Registrar General for Scotland. For gastric cancer, the standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) for the 234 traditional communities in 1969-73 and for the 56 districts in 1979-83 were calculated. For colorectal cancer, only the data for the latter period were available, and SMRs for that period were calculated similarly. Possible determinants on the resulting pattern of high and low SMRs were investigated. Gastric cancer was generally associated with industrial and urban environments, particularly in west central Scotland, although mortality in Dundee was high in both periods; this cancer also showed significant negative correlations with social class II. By contrast, colorectal cancer showed no strong geographical pattern, no urban-rural gradient, and no social class associations. The cancers showed a weak association with each other.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)136-139
    Number of pages4
    JournalScottish Medical Journal
    Volume35
    Issue number5
    Publication statusPublished - Oct 1990

    Cite this

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    title = "Gastric and colorectal cancers in Scotland: a study of the geographical distributions and selected associations",
    abstract = "The geographical distributions of gastric and colorectal cancers in Scotland were investigated by analysing the data available for those diseases in the Annual Reports of the Registrar General for Scotland. For gastric cancer, the standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) for the 234 traditional communities in 1969-73 and for the 56 districts in 1979-83 were calculated. For colorectal cancer, only the data for the latter period were available, and SMRs for that period were calculated similarly. Possible determinants on the resulting pattern of high and low SMRs were investigated. Gastric cancer was generally associated with industrial and urban environments, particularly in west central Scotland, although mortality in Dundee was high in both periods; this cancer also showed significant negative correlations with social class II. By contrast, colorectal cancer showed no strong geographical pattern, no urban-rural gradient, and no social class associations. The cancers showed a weak association with each other.",
    author = "Williams, {F. L.} and Lloyd, {O. L.}",
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    Gastric and colorectal cancers in Scotland : a study of the geographical distributions and selected associations. / Williams, F. L.; Lloyd, O. L. .

    In: Scottish Medical Journal, Vol. 35, No. 5, 10.1990, p. 136-139.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Gastric and colorectal cancers in Scotland

    T2 - a study of the geographical distributions and selected associations

    AU - Williams, F. L.

    AU - Lloyd, O. L.

    PY - 1990/10

    Y1 - 1990/10

    N2 - The geographical distributions of gastric and colorectal cancers in Scotland were investigated by analysing the data available for those diseases in the Annual Reports of the Registrar General for Scotland. For gastric cancer, the standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) for the 234 traditional communities in 1969-73 and for the 56 districts in 1979-83 were calculated. For colorectal cancer, only the data for the latter period were available, and SMRs for that period were calculated similarly. Possible determinants on the resulting pattern of high and low SMRs were investigated. Gastric cancer was generally associated with industrial and urban environments, particularly in west central Scotland, although mortality in Dundee was high in both periods; this cancer also showed significant negative correlations with social class II. By contrast, colorectal cancer showed no strong geographical pattern, no urban-rural gradient, and no social class associations. The cancers showed a weak association with each other.

    AB - The geographical distributions of gastric and colorectal cancers in Scotland were investigated by analysing the data available for those diseases in the Annual Reports of the Registrar General for Scotland. For gastric cancer, the standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) for the 234 traditional communities in 1969-73 and for the 56 districts in 1979-83 were calculated. For colorectal cancer, only the data for the latter period were available, and SMRs for that period were calculated similarly. Possible determinants on the resulting pattern of high and low SMRs were investigated. Gastric cancer was generally associated with industrial and urban environments, particularly in west central Scotland, although mortality in Dundee was high in both periods; this cancer also showed significant negative correlations with social class II. By contrast, colorectal cancer showed no strong geographical pattern, no urban-rural gradient, and no social class associations. The cancers showed a weak association with each other.

    M3 - Article

    VL - 35

    SP - 136

    EP - 139

    JO - Scottish Medical Journal

    JF - Scottish Medical Journal

    SN - 0036-9330

    IS - 5

    ER -