Gaze perception develops atypically in children with autism

Simon Webster, Douglas D. Potter

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    The Mindblindness model is the main model of social cognitive development in autism. This model assumes that eye direction detection and eye contact detection develop typically in autism (Baron-Cohen, 1995). The model's assumption of maturational development implies that when these skills are abnormal, they must either be absent or developmentally delayed. In contrast, the atypical modularisation hypothesis predicts that these skills can develop deviantly—successfully but atypically—in children with autism. Two computer-based tasks were used to assess eye direction detection and eye contact detection in children with autism and in typically developing children. These skills were developmentally deviant in children with autism. The findings support a model of social cognition in autism that accounts for developmental processes.
    Original languageEnglish
    Article number462389
    Number of pages9
    JournalChild Development Research
    Volume2011
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2011

    Fingerprint

    Autistic Disorder
    autism
    modularization
    contact
    social cognition
    cognitive development
    social development
    Cognition

    Cite this

    @article{c875ad22b8da47b8a23f45c00957cfe3,
    title = "Gaze perception develops atypically in children with autism",
    abstract = "The Mindblindness model is the main model of social cognitive development in autism. This model assumes that eye direction detection and eye contact detection develop typically in autism (Baron-Cohen, 1995). The model's assumption of maturational development implies that when these skills are abnormal, they must either be absent or developmentally delayed. In contrast, the atypical modularisation hypothesis predicts that these skills can develop deviantly—successfully but atypically—in children with autism. Two computer-based tasks were used to assess eye direction detection and eye contact detection in children with autism and in typically developing children. These skills were developmentally deviant in children with autism. The findings support a model of social cognition in autism that accounts for developmental processes.",
    author = "Simon Webster and Potter, {Douglas D.}",
    year = "2011",
    doi = "10.1155/2011/462389",
    language = "English",
    volume = "2011",
    journal = "Child Development Research",
    issn = "2090-3987",
    publisher = "Hindawi Publishing Corporation",

    }

    Gaze perception develops atypically in children with autism. / Webster, Simon; Potter, Douglas D.

    In: Child Development Research, Vol. 2011, 462389, 2011.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Gaze perception develops atypically in children with autism

    AU - Webster, Simon

    AU - Potter, Douglas D.

    PY - 2011

    Y1 - 2011

    N2 - The Mindblindness model is the main model of social cognitive development in autism. This model assumes that eye direction detection and eye contact detection develop typically in autism (Baron-Cohen, 1995). The model's assumption of maturational development implies that when these skills are abnormal, they must either be absent or developmentally delayed. In contrast, the atypical modularisation hypothesis predicts that these skills can develop deviantly—successfully but atypically—in children with autism. Two computer-based tasks were used to assess eye direction detection and eye contact detection in children with autism and in typically developing children. These skills were developmentally deviant in children with autism. The findings support a model of social cognition in autism that accounts for developmental processes.

    AB - The Mindblindness model is the main model of social cognitive development in autism. This model assumes that eye direction detection and eye contact detection develop typically in autism (Baron-Cohen, 1995). The model's assumption of maturational development implies that when these skills are abnormal, they must either be absent or developmentally delayed. In contrast, the atypical modularisation hypothesis predicts that these skills can develop deviantly—successfully but atypically—in children with autism. Two computer-based tasks were used to assess eye direction detection and eye contact detection in children with autism and in typically developing children. These skills were developmentally deviant in children with autism. The findings support a model of social cognition in autism that accounts for developmental processes.

    U2 - 10.1155/2011/462389

    DO - 10.1155/2011/462389

    M3 - Article

    VL - 2011

    JO - Child Development Research

    JF - Child Development Research

    SN - 2090-3987

    M1 - 462389

    ER -