Gene expression analysis in Eucalyptus globulus exposed to drought stress in a controlled and a field environment indicates different strategies for short- and longer-term acclimation

Barbara Correia (Lead / Corresponding author), Robert D. Hancock, Luis Valledor, Glória Pinto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Previous knowledge suggested the involvement of specific pathways/proteins that could be identified as potential molecular indicators linked to enhanced drought tolerance in Eucalyptus globulus. Here, we looked for specific variations in key transcripts of two Eucalyptus globulus clones (AL-18 and AL-13) exposed to water deficit and rehydration with two main goals: (i) to check if and how transcripts potentially associated with stress response and protection are modulated in a controlled experiment; and (ii) to verify if the transcript response is robust in a field case study. Our results showed that the controlled experiment induced a severe acute stress that resulted in a strong realignment of gene expression resulting from an overwhelming of physiological adjustments to water limitation. A number of transcripts exhibited altered abundance after the acute water stress: reduction of RuBisCO activase and mitochondrial glycine cleavage system H protein, and increase of isoflavone reductase. Malate dehydrogenase, catalase, dehydration response element B1A and potassium channel GORK showed a different abundance pattern in each clone. The stress in the field was more moderate and chronic and the plants were able to deal with the stress primarily through physiological adjustments resulting in much smaller changes in gene expression. The transcripts of clone AL-18 showed few alterations between irrigated and non-irrigated plants throughout the experiment, while the transcript changes found in clone AL-13 highlighted the impact of early rewatering rather than growing under extended drought typical of a Mediterranean summer. Although a few concurrent responses were found, the results obtained in the field study draw a very distinct picture when compared with the controlled experiment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1623-1639
Number of pages17
JournalTree Physiology
Volume38
Issue number11
Early online date2 Jul 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2018

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Eucalyptus
Acclimatization
Droughts
Clone Cells
Gene Expression
vestitone reductase
Glycine Decarboxylase Complex H-Protein
Dehydration
Malate Dehydrogenase
Water
Fluid Therapy
Potassium Channels
Response Elements
Tissue Plasminogen Activator
Catalase
Proteins

Cite this

@article{be449452e54a4b6e90ed28dd83f3e8e3,
title = "Gene expression analysis in Eucalyptus globulus exposed to drought stress in a controlled and a field environment indicates different strategies for short- and longer-term acclimation",
abstract = "Previous knowledge suggested the involvement of specific pathways/proteins that could be identified as potential molecular indicators linked to enhanced drought tolerance in Eucalyptus globulus. Here, we looked for specific variations in key transcripts of two Eucalyptus globulus clones (AL-18 and AL-13) exposed to water deficit and rehydration with two main goals: (i) to check if and how transcripts potentially associated with stress response and protection are modulated in a controlled experiment; and (ii) to verify if the transcript response is robust in a field case study. Our results showed that the controlled experiment induced a severe acute stress that resulted in a strong realignment of gene expression resulting from an overwhelming of physiological adjustments to water limitation. A number of transcripts exhibited altered abundance after the acute water stress: reduction of RuBisCO activase and mitochondrial glycine cleavage system H protein, and increase of isoflavone reductase. Malate dehydrogenase, catalase, dehydration response element B1A and potassium channel GORK showed a different abundance pattern in each clone. The stress in the field was more moderate and chronic and the plants were able to deal with the stress primarily through physiological adjustments resulting in much smaller changes in gene expression. The transcripts of clone AL-18 showed few alterations between irrigated and non-irrigated plants throughout the experiment, while the transcript changes found in clone AL-13 highlighted the impact of early rewatering rather than growing under extended drought typical of a Mediterranean summer. Although a few concurrent responses were found, the results obtained in the field study draw a very distinct picture when compared with the controlled experiment.",
author = "Barbara Correia and Hancock, {Robert D.} and Luis Valledor and Gl{\'o}ria Pinto",
note = "Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology (Funda{\cc}{\~a}o para a Ci{\^e}ncia e Tecnologia (FCT))/MEC, through national funds, and co-funding by the FEDER (Fundo Europeu de Desenvolvimento Regional), within the PT2020 Partnership Agreement and Compete 2020 provide financial support to CESAM (Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar) (UID/AMB/50017—POCI-01-0145-FEDER-007638). FCT also supported the fellowships of B.C. (SFRH/BD/86448/2012) and G.P. (SFRH/BPD/101669/2014). L.V. was supported by the Ram{\'o}n y Cajal Program (Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness). The James Hutton Institute receives support from by the Rural and Environment Science and Analytical Services Division of the Scottish Government",
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doi = "10.1093/treephys/tpy067",
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publisher = "Oxford University Press",
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Gene expression analysis in Eucalyptus globulus exposed to drought stress in a controlled and a field environment indicates different strategies for short- and longer-term acclimation. / Correia, Barbara (Lead / Corresponding author); Hancock, Robert D.; Valledor, Luis; Pinto, Glória.

In: Tree Physiology, Vol. 38, No. 11, 01.11.2018, p. 1623-1639.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Gene expression analysis in Eucalyptus globulus exposed to drought stress in a controlled and a field environment indicates different strategies for short- and longer-term acclimation

AU - Correia, Barbara

AU - Hancock, Robert D.

AU - Valledor, Luis

AU - Pinto, Glória

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PY - 2018/11/1

Y1 - 2018/11/1

N2 - Previous knowledge suggested the involvement of specific pathways/proteins that could be identified as potential molecular indicators linked to enhanced drought tolerance in Eucalyptus globulus. Here, we looked for specific variations in key transcripts of two Eucalyptus globulus clones (AL-18 and AL-13) exposed to water deficit and rehydration with two main goals: (i) to check if and how transcripts potentially associated with stress response and protection are modulated in a controlled experiment; and (ii) to verify if the transcript response is robust in a field case study. Our results showed that the controlled experiment induced a severe acute stress that resulted in a strong realignment of gene expression resulting from an overwhelming of physiological adjustments to water limitation. A number of transcripts exhibited altered abundance after the acute water stress: reduction of RuBisCO activase and mitochondrial glycine cleavage system H protein, and increase of isoflavone reductase. Malate dehydrogenase, catalase, dehydration response element B1A and potassium channel GORK showed a different abundance pattern in each clone. The stress in the field was more moderate and chronic and the plants were able to deal with the stress primarily through physiological adjustments resulting in much smaller changes in gene expression. The transcripts of clone AL-18 showed few alterations between irrigated and non-irrigated plants throughout the experiment, while the transcript changes found in clone AL-13 highlighted the impact of early rewatering rather than growing under extended drought typical of a Mediterranean summer. Although a few concurrent responses were found, the results obtained in the field study draw a very distinct picture when compared with the controlled experiment.

AB - Previous knowledge suggested the involvement of specific pathways/proteins that could be identified as potential molecular indicators linked to enhanced drought tolerance in Eucalyptus globulus. Here, we looked for specific variations in key transcripts of two Eucalyptus globulus clones (AL-18 and AL-13) exposed to water deficit and rehydration with two main goals: (i) to check if and how transcripts potentially associated with stress response and protection are modulated in a controlled experiment; and (ii) to verify if the transcript response is robust in a field case study. Our results showed that the controlled experiment induced a severe acute stress that resulted in a strong realignment of gene expression resulting from an overwhelming of physiological adjustments to water limitation. A number of transcripts exhibited altered abundance after the acute water stress: reduction of RuBisCO activase and mitochondrial glycine cleavage system H protein, and increase of isoflavone reductase. Malate dehydrogenase, catalase, dehydration response element B1A and potassium channel GORK showed a different abundance pattern in each clone. The stress in the field was more moderate and chronic and the plants were able to deal with the stress primarily through physiological adjustments resulting in much smaller changes in gene expression. The transcripts of clone AL-18 showed few alterations between irrigated and non-irrigated plants throughout the experiment, while the transcript changes found in clone AL-13 highlighted the impact of early rewatering rather than growing under extended drought typical of a Mediterranean summer. Although a few concurrent responses were found, the results obtained in the field study draw a very distinct picture when compared with the controlled experiment.

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EP - 1639

JO - Tree Physiology

JF - Tree Physiology

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