General practitioners' experience of teaching a community course to undergraduate medical students: A qualitative study

Shona Lammie, Edwin Van Teijlingen (Lead / Corresponding author), Hazel Sinclair, Blair Smith, Fiona French, Ross Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The General Medical Council recommended changes in the medical curricula of UK universities in 1993. Consequently, the University of Aberdeen designed a new course to introduce 'health and normality' through group work, community-based teaching and early patient contact. To ascertain the views of general practitioners (family physicians) on their experience of tutoring on, their attitudes towards, and perceptions of, the new course, they were surveyed by means of a small-scale questionnaire study followed by semi-structured interviews. These showed that they generally enjoyed tutoring and appreciated the students' opportunity for early patient contact and the emphasis on group work. However, constraints on teaching accommodation in the community and general practitioners' time need to be borne in mind when designing a community-based curriculum, in order to maintain overall quality, and tutors' motivation and enthusiasm.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)239-248
Number of pages10
JournalEducation for Primary Care
Volume13
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - May 2002

Keywords

  • Community-based education
  • General practice
  • Undergraduate education

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'General practitioners' experience of teaching a community course to undergraduate medical students: A qualitative study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this