Greater number of group identifications is associated with lower odds of being depressed: evidence from a Scottish community sample

Fabio Sani (Lead / Corresponding author), Vishnu B. Madhok, Michael Norbury, Pat Dugard, Juliet R. H. Wakefield

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    29 Citations (Scopus)
    135 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    Purpose: Group identification has been shown to be associated with reduced risk of depression, but this research has important limitations. Our aim was to establish a robust link between group identification and depression whilst overcoming previous studies’ shortcomings. Methods: 1824 participants, recruited from General Practice throughout Scotland, completed a questionnaire measuring their identification with three groups (family, community, and a group of their choice), as well as their intensity of contact with each group. They also completed a self-rated depression measure and provided demographic information. Their medical records were also accessed in order to determine if they had been prescribed antidepressants in the previous 6 months. Results: Number of group identifications was associated with both lower self-rated depression and lower odds of having received a prescription for antidepressants, even after controlling for number of contact-intensive groups, level of education, gender, age, and relationship status.
    Conclusions: Identifying with multiple groups may help to protect individuals against depression. This highlights the potential importance of social prescriptions, where health professionals encourage a depressed patient to become a member of one or more groups with which the patient believes he/she would be likely to identify.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1389-1397
    Number of pages9
    JournalSocial Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology
    Volume50
    Issue number9
    Early online date10 Jun 2015
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 2015

    Keywords

    • Group identification
    • Social determinants of heath
    • Health
    • Depression
    • Antidepressants

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Greater number of group identifications is associated with lower odds of being depressed: evidence from a Scottish community sample'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this