'Grocer meets Butcher': Marcello Caetano's London Visit of 1973 and the Last Days of Portugal's Estado Novo

Norrie MacQueen, Pedro Aires Oliveira

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    17 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The visit of the Portuguese premier Marcelo Caetano to London in July 1973 failed to boost Portugal's international respectability. Instead, despite the qualified sympathy of the British Conservative government, the visit highlighted Lisbon's isolation from the realities of the cold war and dtente. Public protests punctuated the visit, and the gulf between the attitudes of the main British political parties to Portugal and its African policies was exposed. Labour's subsequent return to power in 1974 coincided with the overthrow of the Caetano regime and the new London government helped mediate the outwardly alarming 'revolutionary process' in Portugal to a nervous western alliance.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)29-50
    Number of pages22
    JournalCold War History
    Volume10
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

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    Portugal
    sympathy
    cold war
    protest
    social isolation
    regime
    labor
    Estado Novo
    Government
    Sympathy
    Labor
    Cold War
    Alliances
    Respectability
    Africa
    Lisbon
    Revolution
    Protest
    Isolation
    Political Parties

    Cite this

    MacQueen, Norrie ; Oliveira, Pedro Aires. / 'Grocer meets Butcher' : Marcello Caetano's London Visit of 1973 and the Last Days of Portugal's Estado Novo. In: Cold War History. 2010 ; Vol. 10, No. 1. pp. 29-50.
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    'Grocer meets Butcher' : Marcello Caetano's London Visit of 1973 and the Last Days of Portugal's Estado Novo. / MacQueen, Norrie; Oliveira, Pedro Aires.

    In: Cold War History, Vol. 10, No. 1, 2010, p. 29-50.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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