HAPPY mapping in a plant genome: reconstruction and analysis of a high-resolution physical map of a 1.9 Mbp region of Arabidopsis thaliana chromosome 4

Madan Thangavelu, Allan B. James, Alan Bankier, Glenn J. Bryan, Paul H. Dear (Lead / Corresponding author), Robbie Waugh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

HAPPY mapping is an in vitro approach for defining the order and spacing of DNA markers directly on native genomic DNA. This cloning-free technique is based on analysing the segregation of markers amplified from high molecular weight genomic DNA which has been broken randomly and ‘segregated’ by limiting dilution into subhaploid samples. It is a uniquely versatile tool, allowing for the construction of genome maps with flexible ranges and resolutions. Moreover, it is applicable to plant genomes, for which many of the techniques pioneered in animal genomes are inapplicable or inappropriate. We report here its demonstration in a plant genome by reconstructing the physical map of a 1.9 Mbp region around the FCA locus of Arabidopsis thaliana. The resulting map, spanning around 10% of chromosome 4, is in excellent agreement with the DNA sequence and has a mean marker spacing of 16 kbp. We argue that HAPPY maps of any required resolution can be made immediately and with relatively little effort for most plant species and, furthermore, that such maps can greatly aid the construction of regional or genome-wide physical maps.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)23-31
Number of pages9
JournalPlant Biotechnology Journal
Volume1
Issue number1
Early online date19 Dec 2002
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2003

Keywords

  • DNA markers
  • HAPPY mapping
  • PEP amplification
  • plant genome mapping

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Plant Science

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