Heavy metal tolerance and biotransformation of toxic metal compounds by new isolates of wood-rotting fungi from Thailand

Benjawan Kaewdoung, Thanawat Sutjaritvorakul (Lead / Corresponding author), Geoffrey M. Gadd, Anthony J S Whalley, Prakitsin Sihanonth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Eighteen isolates of wood-rotting fungi isolated from Thailand were screened for the ability to produce metal-containing crystals from zinc, copper, cadmium and lead salts-amended culture medium. Five isolates (MR40, KYO, WR3, WR4 and WR5) were able to produce mycogenic crystals in 0.5% (w/v) heavy metal compound amended plates. The crystals were further investigated by scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EDXA) and identified by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). The selected fungi were found to be capable of transforming zinc sulfate (ZnSO4·7H2O) into zinc oxalate dihydrate (C2O2Zn·2H2O), copper sulfate (CuSO4·5H2O) into copper oxalate hydrate (C2CuO4·xH2O), cadmium sulfate (3CdSO4·8H2O) into cadmium oxalate trihydrate (C2CdO4·3H2O) and lead nitrate (Pb(NO3)2) into lead oxalate (PbC2O4). Two of the selected strains (Fomitopsis cf. meliae and Ganoderma aff. steyaertanum) have not been previously reported to have heavy metal compound transformation abilities. These results provide further evidence that wood-rotting fungi can remove heavy metals from a metal-amended substrate by precipitation as metal oxalates: wood-rotting fungi could therefore be applied for detoxification of heavy metal pollution.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)283-288
Number of pages6
JournalGeomicrobiology Journal
Volume33
Issue number3-4
Early online date25 Feb 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Mar 2016

Keywords

  • Bioremediation
  • biotransformation
  • heavy metal
  • wood-rotting fungi

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