Heterocellular OSM-OSMR signalling reprograms fibroblasts to promote pancreatic cancer growth and metastasis

Brian Y. Lee, Elizabeth K. J. Hogg, Christopher R. Below, Alexander Kononov, Adrian Blanco-Gomez, Felix Heider, Jingshu Xu, Colin Hutton, Xiaohong Zhang, Tamara Scheidt, Kenneth Beattie, Angela Lamarca, Mairéad McNamara, Juan W. Valle, Claus Jørgensen (Lead / Corresponding author)

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Abstract

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is a lethal malignancy with a complex microenvironment. Dichotomous tumour-promoting and -restrictive roles have been ascribed to the tumour microenvironment, however the effects of individual stromal subsets remain incompletely characterised. Here, we describe how heterocellular Oncostatin M (OSM) - Oncostatin M Receptor (OSMR) signalling reprograms fibroblasts, regulates tumour growth and metastasis. Macrophage-secreted OSM stimulates inflammatory gene expression in cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), which in turn induce a pro-tumourigenic environment and engage tumour cell survival and migratory signalling pathways. Tumour cells implanted in Osm-deficient (Osm−/−) mice display an epithelial-dominated morphology, reduced tumour growth and do not metastasise. Moreover, the tumour microenvironment of Osm−/− animals exhibit increased abundance of α smooth muscle actin positive myofibroblasts and a shift in myeloid and T cell phenotypes, consistent with a more immunogenic environment. Taken together, these data demonstrate how OSM-OSMR signalling coordinates heterocellular interactions to drive a pro-tumourigenic environment in PDA.

Original languageEnglish
Article number7336
Number of pages20
JournalNature Communications
Volume12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Dec 2021

Keywords

  • Cancer microenvironment
  • Cell signalling
  • Tumour immunology

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