Homo – sociologicus – sapiens: Zur evolutionstheoretischen Einbettung soziologischer Menschenmodelle

Translated title of the contribution: Homo – sociologicus – sapiens: On the Integration of Sociological Models of Man in the Theory of Evolution

Klaus Gilgenmann, Bertold Schweitzer

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In this paper concerns the adequacy of competing models of the people in the sociological, socio-economic and socio-biological theory tradition for the explanation of complex social phenomena. It is proposed that in the mainstream sociological theory tradition preferred model to modify the socialized man by embedding in an evolutionary theoretical concept which receives the objections of the economic tradition with regard to individual decisions on actions and objections from the biological tradition with regard to genetic influences, without the independent importance of culture to eliminate social science explanations. In an evolutionary sketch is shown that an application of Darwin's theory on socio-cultural phenomena of man is possible to cooperate in the genetic, situational and cultural factors as causal factors unrelated. Culture is seen in it as an adaptive process in which the genetically inherited organism-environment relationships in emergent forms of social systems and cultural environments are expanded. With regard to causal explanations through evolutionary mechanisms, the proportion of human individuals for the dynamic aspects of socio-cultural phenomena is emphasized.

    Translated title of the contributionHomo – sociologicus – sapiens: On the Integration of Sociological Models of Man in the Theory of Evolution
    Original languageGerman
    Pages (from-to)348-371
    Number of pages24
    JournalZeitschrift für Soziologie
    Volume35
    Issue number5
    Publication statusPublished - Oct 2006

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