How Computer Simulations Can Assist Model Generation In Students: Providing an Adaptable Structure to Guide Student Learning

David Sprague, Svetlana Trey, Sharmila Pillay, Samia Khan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Le Châtelier's principle and chemical equilibrium are considered two of the most difficult topics for students in high school chemistry, and despite the development of numerous simulations, software solutions have met with limited success. We present two case studies of expert teachers teaching Le Châtelier's Principle and show how the findings of the case studies have informed the design of a novel simulation. We have identified several key tactics used by these teachers that are not currently supported or enhanced by available simulations. Based on these studies, we have designed a novel simulation that 1) affords opportunities for model construction with analogies, 2) facilitates model evaluation by providing multiple reaction representations, and 3) guides learning by explicitly requesting predictions from students. This paper reveals strategies to promote model-based learning in chemistry and a design for an educational simulation that has been closely informed by model-based teaching practices
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of ED-MEDIA 2005
Subtitle of host publicationWorld Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications
EditorsPiet Kommers, Griff Richards
Place of PublicationUnited States
PublisherAssociation for the Advancement of Computing in Education
Pages1666-1673
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9781880094563
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Keywords

  • case study
  • Chemical Equilibrium
  • chemistry
  • Chemistry Equilibrium
  • Dynamic Equilibrium
  • Students
  • Teachers

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'How Computer Simulations Can Assist Model Generation In Students: Providing an Adaptable Structure to Guide Student Learning'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Sprague, D., Trey, S., Pillay, S., & Khan, S. (2005). How Computer Simulations Can Assist Model Generation In Students: Providing an Adaptable Structure to Guide Student Learning. In P. Kommers, & G. Richards (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2005: World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 1666-1673). Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education. https://www.learntechlib.org/p/20316/