Identification of human remains using comparison of dermal-epidermal fingerprints collected from Thiel-embalmed bodies (oral presentation)

Research output: Contribution to conferenceOther

Abstract

Direct comparison of dermal and epidermal fingerprints may be vital to the identification of bodies that have been in water for long periods of time where the epidermal skin layer is no longer available. Epidermal desquamation occurs during the fixation of a body in Thiel embalming fluid revealing dermal surface of the skin which provides an opportunity to compare dermal and epidermal fingerprints from one individual. The aim of the study is to compare the quality of epidermal and dermal fingerprints collected from Thiel-embalmed bodies and report on first comparisons of epidermal and dermal fingerprints conducted by fingerprint examiners. Fingerprints were collected from bodies bequeathed to the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification, University of Dundee, using black powder and photography prior to embalming (epidermal) and after the completion of embalming (dermal). Epidermal and dermal fingerprints (Ntotal = 3393) were assessed for quality by an untrained observer. The quality was assessed in 80 epidermal-dermal fingerprint pairs (Npowder = 40, Nphoto = 40) by experienced fingerprint examiners (Nexpert = 5). The fingerprint examiners also analysed and compared the paired fingerprints to establish an identification outcome. The fingerprint quality assessment results show the epidermal fingerprints have higher level of quality when compared to dermal fingerprints regardless of fingerprint collection technique. Preliminary results of fingerprint comparison show the fingerprint examiners were able to match a pair of fingerprints (positive identification) in 10 to 15 % of cases and they were able to establish fingerprint pairs as non-matching in 30 to 45 % of cases.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 23 Dec 2019
EventBritish Association for Human Identification Winter Conference 2019 - Chancellors Hotel, Manchester, United Kingdom
Duration: 22 Nov 201923 Nov 2019

Conference

ConferenceBritish Association for Human Identification Winter Conference 2019
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityManchester
Period22/11/1923/11/19

Fingerprint

public speaking
skin (animal)
photography
powders
water
methodology

Cite this

@conference{687632cc8fe24ce28aaeb67740b524ed,
title = "Identification of human remains using comparison of dermal-epidermal fingerprints collected from Thiel-embalmed bodies (oral presentation)",
abstract = "Direct comparison of dermal and epidermal fingerprints may be vital to the identification of bodies that have been in water for long periods of time where the epidermal skin layer is no longer available. Epidermal desquamation occurs during the fixation of a body in Thiel embalming fluid revealing dermal surface of the skin which provides an opportunity to compare dermal and epidermal fingerprints from one individual. The aim of the study is to compare the quality of epidermal and dermal fingerprints collected from Thiel-embalmed bodies and report on first comparisons of epidermal and dermal fingerprints conducted by fingerprint examiners. Fingerprints were collected from bodies bequeathed to the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification, University of Dundee, using black powder and photography prior to embalming (epidermal) and after the completion of embalming (dermal). Epidermal and dermal fingerprints (Ntotal = 3393) were assessed for quality by an untrained observer. The quality was assessed in 80 epidermal-dermal fingerprint pairs (Npowder = 40, Nphoto = 40) by experienced fingerprint examiners (Nexpert = 5). The fingerprint examiners also analysed and compared the paired fingerprints to establish an identification outcome. The fingerprint quality assessment results show the epidermal fingerprints have higher level of quality when compared to dermal fingerprints regardless of fingerprint collection technique. Preliminary results of fingerprint comparison show the fingerprint examiners were able to match a pair of fingerprints (positive identification) in 10 to 15 {\%} of cases and they were able to establish fingerprint pairs as non-matching in 30 to 45 {\%} of cases.",
author = "Veronika Dzetkulicov{\'a} and Lucina Hackman and Helen Langstaff",
year = "2019",
month = "12",
day = "23",
language = "English",
note = "British Association for Human Identification Winter Conference 2019 ; Conference date: 22-11-2019 Through 23-11-2019",

}

Dzetkulicová, V, Hackman, L & Langstaff, H 2019, 'Identification of human remains using comparison of dermal-epidermal fingerprints collected from Thiel-embalmed bodies (oral presentation)', British Association for Human Identification Winter Conference 2019, Manchester, United Kingdom, 22/11/19 - 23/11/19.

Identification of human remains using comparison of dermal-epidermal fingerprints collected from Thiel-embalmed bodies (oral presentation). / Dzetkulicová, Veronika; Hackman, Lucina (Supervisor); Langstaff, Helen (Supervisor).

2019. British Association for Human Identification Winter Conference 2019, Manchester, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceOther

TY - CONF

T1 - Identification of human remains using comparison of dermal-epidermal fingerprints collected from Thiel-embalmed bodies (oral presentation)

AU - Dzetkulicová, Veronika

A2 - Hackman, Lucina

A2 - Langstaff, Helen

PY - 2019/12/23

Y1 - 2019/12/23

N2 - Direct comparison of dermal and epidermal fingerprints may be vital to the identification of bodies that have been in water for long periods of time where the epidermal skin layer is no longer available. Epidermal desquamation occurs during the fixation of a body in Thiel embalming fluid revealing dermal surface of the skin which provides an opportunity to compare dermal and epidermal fingerprints from one individual. The aim of the study is to compare the quality of epidermal and dermal fingerprints collected from Thiel-embalmed bodies and report on first comparisons of epidermal and dermal fingerprints conducted by fingerprint examiners. Fingerprints were collected from bodies bequeathed to the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification, University of Dundee, using black powder and photography prior to embalming (epidermal) and after the completion of embalming (dermal). Epidermal and dermal fingerprints (Ntotal = 3393) were assessed for quality by an untrained observer. The quality was assessed in 80 epidermal-dermal fingerprint pairs (Npowder = 40, Nphoto = 40) by experienced fingerprint examiners (Nexpert = 5). The fingerprint examiners also analysed and compared the paired fingerprints to establish an identification outcome. The fingerprint quality assessment results show the epidermal fingerprints have higher level of quality when compared to dermal fingerprints regardless of fingerprint collection technique. Preliminary results of fingerprint comparison show the fingerprint examiners were able to match a pair of fingerprints (positive identification) in 10 to 15 % of cases and they were able to establish fingerprint pairs as non-matching in 30 to 45 % of cases.

AB - Direct comparison of dermal and epidermal fingerprints may be vital to the identification of bodies that have been in water for long periods of time where the epidermal skin layer is no longer available. Epidermal desquamation occurs during the fixation of a body in Thiel embalming fluid revealing dermal surface of the skin which provides an opportunity to compare dermal and epidermal fingerprints from one individual. The aim of the study is to compare the quality of epidermal and dermal fingerprints collected from Thiel-embalmed bodies and report on first comparisons of epidermal and dermal fingerprints conducted by fingerprint examiners. Fingerprints were collected from bodies bequeathed to the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification, University of Dundee, using black powder and photography prior to embalming (epidermal) and after the completion of embalming (dermal). Epidermal and dermal fingerprints (Ntotal = 3393) were assessed for quality by an untrained observer. The quality was assessed in 80 epidermal-dermal fingerprint pairs (Npowder = 40, Nphoto = 40) by experienced fingerprint examiners (Nexpert = 5). The fingerprint examiners also analysed and compared the paired fingerprints to establish an identification outcome. The fingerprint quality assessment results show the epidermal fingerprints have higher level of quality when compared to dermal fingerprints regardless of fingerprint collection technique. Preliminary results of fingerprint comparison show the fingerprint examiners were able to match a pair of fingerprints (positive identification) in 10 to 15 % of cases and they were able to establish fingerprint pairs as non-matching in 30 to 45 % of cases.

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