Impact of a bottom-up community engagement intervention on maternal and child health services utilization in Ghana: a cluster randomised trial

Robert Kaba Alhassan (Lead / Corresponding author), Edward Nketiah-Amponsah, Martin Amogre Ayanore, Agani Afaya, Solomon Mohammed Salia, Japiong Milipaak, Evelyn Korkor Ansah, Seth Owusu-Agyei

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)
3 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background
Ghana is among African countries not likely to achieve the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) three (3) target of reducing maternal mortality to 70 per 100,000 live births by the year 2030 if maternal and child health services utilization are not improved. Community engagement in health is therefore advocated to help address this challenge. This study evaluated the impact of a community engagement intervention on maternal and child health services utilization in Ghana.
Methods
This study was a cluster randomised trial among primary healthcare facilities (n = 64) in the Greater Accra and Western regions in Ghana. Multivariate multiple regression analysis and paired-ttest were used to determine impact of the community engagement intervention on maternal and child health indicators at baseline and follow-up.
Results
Intervention health facilities recorded significant improvements over control facilities in terms of average spontaneous vaginal deliveries per month per health facility (baseline mean = 15, follow-up mean = 30, p = 0.0013); child immunizations (baseline mean = 270, follow-up mean = 455, p = 0.0642) and female condoms distribution (baseline mean = 0, follow-up mean = 2, p = 0.0628). Other improved indicators in intervention facilities were average number of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) tests for non-pregnant women (baseline mean = 55, follow-up 104, p = 0.0213); HIV tests for pregnant women (baseline mean = 40, follow-up mean = 119, p = 0.0067) and malaria tests (baseline mean = 43, follow-up mean = 380, p = 0.0174). Control facilities however performed better than intervention facilities in terms of general laboratory tests, voluntary counselling and testing, treatment of sexually transmitted infections, male child circumcisions and other minor surgical procedures.
Conclusion
Community engagement in health has the potential of improving utilization of maternal and child health services. There is the need for multi-stakeholder dialogues on complementing existing quality improvement interventions with community engagement strategies.
Original languageEnglish
Article number791
Number of pages11
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume19
Early online date21 Jun 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2019

Keywords

  • Clients
  • Community engagement
  • Cluster randomised trial
  • Ghana
  • Intervention
  • Primary healthcare
  • Utilization

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Impact of a bottom-up community engagement intervention on maternal and child health services utilization in Ghana: a cluster randomised trial'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this